Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGY, GENOMICS, AND MANAGEMENT OF STORED PRODUCT INSECTS

Location: Stored Product Insect Research Unit

Title: Behavioral responses of the potato psyllid (Hemiptera: Triozidae) to volatiles from dimethyl disulfide and plant essential oils

Authors
item DIAZ-MONTANO, JOHN
item Trumble, John -

Submitted to: Journal of Insect Behavior
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 26, 2012
Publication Date: April 4, 2013
Citation: Diaz-Montano, J., Trumble, J.T. 2013. Behavioral responses of the potato psyllid (Hemiptera: Triozidae) to volatiles from dimethyl disulfide and plant essential oils. Journal of Insect Behavior. 26(3): 336-3351. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10905-012-9350-8.

Interpretive Summary: The potato psyllid is a pest that causes substantial economic losses to important solanaceous crops, such as potatoes, tomatoes, and peppers, by direct feeding and pathogen transmission. Chemical insecticides are the main control tactic for this insect, but repeated applications have led to pesticide resistance and can reduce populations of natural enemies that suppress other pests. Therefore, we explored the possible use of repellents as alternative method of control. The behavioral responses of potato psyllid adults to a slow-release wax formulation containing dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and to 12 plant essential oils were investigated. DMDS repelled psyllids, and the residual effect of 1 gram of DMDS persisted for 10 consecutive days. Cedar wood, lime, savory, thyme, and tea tree oils repelled adults at all doses. Moreover, the residual effects of 1 milliliter of five oils (thyme, tea tree, peppermint, savory, and clove) were repellent to psyllids throughout a 20-day trial. The results of this study are promising for the incorporation of repellents into an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program to control the potato psyllid.

Technical Abstract: The behavioral responses of the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), to dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and to 12 plant essential oils were examined in a glass Y-tube olfactometer. DMDS at doses of 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 g showed a significant repellent effect on the psyllids. Cedar wood, lime, savory, thyme, and tea tree oils demonstrated significant repellency on adults at all doses tested (1, 10, 100, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ul). The oils of clove and peppermint also had a significant repellent effect on adults at all doses except at the lowest dose (1 ul). The residual effect of 1 g of DMDS persisted for 10 consecutive days and for the 20-day longevity trial for five oils (thyme, tea tree, peppermint, savory, and clove).

Last Modified: 9/10/2014