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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Modelling female mating success during mass trapping and natural competitive attraction of searching males or females

Author
item BYERS, JOHN

Submitted to: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 3, 2012
Publication Date: December 12, 2012
Citation: Byers, J.A. (2012). Modelling female mating success during mass trapping and natural competitive attraction of searching males or females. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata. 145:228-237.

Interpretive Summary: Two types of simulation models of mass trapping, a control method used in integrated pest management of insects, were developed: (1) male-searching insects (e.g., moths and many insect species) and (2) female-searching insects (e.g., true bugs, beetles, and flies). The searching sex moved forward at a constant speed for a set amount of time, while the opposite sex remained stationary and released an attractive sex pheromone in the model. Males or females, depending on the model, encountered natural pheromone or pheromone-baited traps represented as a circular effective attraction radius (EARc). In simulations, parameters of trap-lure EARc and number, stationary female or male EARc and number, area, and searching female or male number were varied. The male or female movement parameters (speed, turning angle, period of search, and step size) remained constant to evaluate effects on the percentages of females meeting males and mating. In the natural condition without traps, both male and female search models caused the same percentage of females to mate. Increasing the EARc size of traps or number of traps caused a similar decline or increase in female mating, respectively, in both models, but the female-search model had less females mated than in the male-search model. Increasing numbers of insects or traps caused a similar increase or decline in female mating, respectively, in both models, and again the female-search model had less females mating than the male-search model. The models have implications for mating lek formation and are useful in understanding the variables affecting the success of control programs for insect pests with different sexual roles of producing and responding to sex pheromone.

Technical Abstract: Two types of simulation models of mass trapping were developed: (1) male-searching insects (e.g., moths and many insect species) and (2) female-searching insects (e.g., true bugs, beetles, and flies). The searching sex moved based on correlated random walks (CRW), while the opposite sex remained stationary and released an attractive sex pheromone. Males or females, depending on the model, encountered natural pheromone or pheromone-baited traps represented as a circular probability surface of catch, termed the effective attraction radius (EARc). In simulations, parameters of trap-lure EARc and number, stationary female or male EARc and number, area, and searching female or male number were varied. The male or female CRW parameters (speed, turning angle, period of search, and step size) remained constant to evaluate effects on the percentages of females mating. In the natural condition without traps, both male and female search models caused the same percentage of females to mate. Increasing EARc of traps or number of traps caused a similar decline or increase in female mating, respectively, in both models, but the female-search model had less females mated than in the male-search model. Increasing numbers of insects or traps caused a similar increase or decline in female mating, respectively, in both models, and again the female-search model had less females mating than the male-search model. The models have implications for mating lek formation and are useful in understanding the variables affecting the success of control programs for insect pests with different sexual roles of producing and responding to sex pheromone.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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