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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCING PROFITABILITY & SUSTAINABILITY UPLAND COTTON, COTTONSEED, & COTTON BYPROD THROUGH IMPRVMNTS IN HARVESTING, GINNING, & MECH PROCESS

Location: Cotton Production and Processing Research

Title: Crop residue inventory estimates for Texas High Plains cotton

Authors
item Wanjura, John
item Faulkner, W -
item Barnes, E -
item Holt, Gregory
item Pelletier, Mathew

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2012
Publication Date: April 20, 2012
Citation: Wanjura, J.D., Faulkner, W.B., Barnes, E.M., Holt, G.A., Pelletier, M.G. 2012. Crop residue inventory estimates for Texas High Plains cotton. In: Proceedings of the Beltwide Cotton Conferences, January 3-6, 2012, Orlando, Florida. 2012 CDROM. p. 542-552.

Interpretive Summary: Interest in the use of cotton by-products as feed stock for biofuel production and value-added product manufacturing is increasing. Research is needed to estimate the availability and potential value of this resource. This work was conducted to document the total biomass produced by an irrigated cotton crop in the US Southern High Plains and demonstrate the value of this biomass under unique environmental conditions encountered during 2011. Results indicate that about half of the biomass produced by the crop remains in the field after the lint and seed are mechanically harvested. The amount of biomass separated from the seed cotton at the gin is highest for stripper harvested cotton and lowest for picker harvested cotton. The value of cotton by-product material for livestock feed can be considerable under severe drought conditions, like those experienced in 2011. Thus, some producers may consider bypassing the field cleaner onboard a stripper harvester to increase the amount of foreign material taken to the gin and thereby increase economic revenue. If the trash sales price (or the credit for gin trash from the gin) is less than the gross ginning price, producers should not consider bypassing the field cleaner on a cotton stripper. If the trash sales price is equal to or greater than the gross ginning price, producers may realize an economic benefit by bringing additional foreign material to the gin (i.e., bypassing a cotton stripper field cleaner). However, producers should also consider potential decreases in lint value and harvest productivity prior to deciding to bypass the field cleaner on a cotton stripper.

Technical Abstract: Interest in the use of cotton crop by-products for the production of bio-fuels and value-added products is increasing. Research documenting the availability of cotton crop by-products after machine harvest is needed. The objectives of this work were to document the total biomass production for modern cotton cultivars under irrigated conditions, document the production of lint, seed, and foreign matter for modern cultivars, and demonstrate the value of cotton by-products separated by the gin under unique environmental conditions encountered during 2011. The results of this work indicate that approximately half of the total biomass produced by two modern cultivars under irrigated conditions remained in the field after machine harvest. Lint turnout for cotton harvested using a picker, stripper with field cleaner, and stripper without field cleaner averaged 35%, 30%, and 25%, respectively, for seven recent cotton harvesting and ginning studies. These turnout values were measured for modern cotton cultivars grown under production conditions typical to the Southern High Plains of the US and follow closely with turnout values reported in earlier publications. The value of cotton by-product material for livestock feed can be considerable under severe drought conditions, like those experienced in 2011. Thus, some producers may consider bypassing the field cleaner onboard a stripper harvester to increase the amount of foreign material taken to the gin and thereby increase economic revenue. If the trash sales price (or the credit for gin trash from the gin) is less than the gross ginning price, producers should not consider bypassing the field cleaner on a cotton stripper. If the trash sales price is equal to or greater than the gross ginning price, producers may realize an economic benefit by bringing additional foreign material to the gin (i.e., bypassing a cotton stripper field cleaner). However, producers should also consider potential decreases in lint value and harvest productivity prior to deciding to bypass the field cleaner on a cotton stripper.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014