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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHOLOGIES & STRATEGIES FOR ARTHROPOD PESTS OF PERENNIAL TROPICAL CROPS IMP. TO THE US, .. COFFEE

Location: Sustainable Perennial Crops

Title: From forest to plantation? Obscure papers reveal alternate host plants for the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

Authors
item Vega, Fernando
item Davis, Aaron -
item Jaramillo, Juliana -

Submitted to: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, London
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2012
Publication Date: September 1, 2012
Citation: Vega, F.E., Davis, A.P., Jaramillo, J. 2012. From forest to plantation? Obscure papers reveal alternate host plants for the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, London. 107:86-94.

Interpretive Summary: The coffee berry borer is the most devastating pest of coffee throughout the world and causes millions of dollars in losses each year. Increased knowledge on the basic biology of the coffee berry borer can result in new insights on how to control this insect, thereby reducing losses and increasing yields. In this paper we report on its alternate host plants, i.e., what fruits of plants, other than coffee, can the insect survive and reproduce in. This information will be of use to coffee scientists, entomologists, microbiologists, and the coffee industry.

Technical Abstract: The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most devastating insect pest of coffee throughout the world. The insect is endemic to Africa but can now be found throughout nearly all coffee producing countries. One area of the basic biology of the insect that remains in question is its alternate host plants, i.e., what fruits of plants, other than coffee, can the insect survive and reproduce in. An in-depth survey of the literature revealed a paper listing 21 genera in 13 families in which the insect was collected. This overlooked reference, together with information provided in other early papers, suggest that H. hampei is polyphagous and could provide, if confirmed in the field, critical information on the evolution of this insects diet, ecology and host range.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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