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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF TEMPERATE FRUIT NUT AND SPECIALTY CROP GENETIC RESOURCES Title: Cold hardiness and foliar disease resistance of North American and Asian Fragaria

Authors
item Yao, Shengrui -
item Hummer, Kim
item Luby, Jim -

Submitted to: Journal of American Pomological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2012
Publication Date: June 18, 2012
Citation: Yao, S., Hummer, K.E., Luby, J. 2012. Cold hardiness and foliar disease resistance of North American and Asian Fragaria. Journal of American Pomological Society. 66(2):46-55.

Interpretive Summary: Thirty-two wild strawberry plants and two commercial cultivars were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Clonal Germplasm Repository-Corvallis (NCGR) and planted in the field to test cold hardiness and foliar disease resistance at the University of Minnesota North Central Research and Outreach Center at Grand Rapids, MN. This station is located in USDA plant hardiness zone 3b. Among the 34 genotypes tested, a strawberry species from the mountains of Hokkaido was sensitive to powdery mildew, leaf scorch, frost and mid-winter injury; A strawberry species from lower elevations on Hokkaido was resistant to powdery mildew and leaf scorch. The mountain strawberry from Hokkaido suffered severe injury after winter 2009-10, while several other Asian species survived that winter well, producing dense and vigorous plants in 2010. These species could be potentially useful as parents in breeding programs developing strawberries for the mid-western United States. The beach strawberry (PI 637983), was similar to the standard cultivars for winter hardiness and disease resistance. Wild strawberries bloomed earlier and had softer, smaller fruit than did the commercial ‘Jewel’ and ‘Mesabi’. The Japanese strawberry from lower elevations had the softest fruit. A strawberry from the Russian far east was notable for pleasing taste and aroma, while most wild strawberry fruits were very sour. The escaped cultivated strawberries from the Sakhalin Territory may have the greatest immediate utility, with a combination of winter hardiness and excellent disease resistance, for most breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: Thirty-two wild strawberry genotypes and two commercial cultivars were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Clonal Germplasm Repository-Corvallis (NCGR) and planted in the field to test cold hardiness and foliar disease resistance at the University of Minnesota North Central Research and Outreach Center at Grand Rapids, MN. This station is located in USDA plant hardiness zone 3b. Among the 34 genotypes tested, Fragaria iinumae was sensitive to powdery mildew, leaf scorch, frost and mid-winter injury; F. nipponica was resistant to powdery mildew and leaf scorch. Fragaria iinumae suffered severe injury after winter 2009-10, while F. nipponica and F. orientalis survived that winter well, producing dense and vigorous plants in 2010. These species could be potentially useful diploid or tetraploid parents in breeding programs developing strawberries for the mid-western United States. Fragaria chiloensis PI 637983, was similar to the standard cultivars for winter hardiness and disease resistance. Wild strawberries bloomed earlier and had softer, smaller fruit than did the commercial F. ×ananassa ‘Jewel’ and ‘Mesabi’. Fragaria nipponica had the softest fruit. Fragaria orientalis PI 637933 and PI 637939 were notable for their pleasing taste and aroma, while most Fragaria nipponica, F. iturupensis, and F. virginiana were very sour. The feral F. × ananassa PI 641087 and PI 641088 may have the greatest immediate utility, with a combination of winter hardiness and excellent disease resistance, for octoploid breeding programs.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014