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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICALLY BASED MANAGEMENT OF BOLL WEEVILS AND OTHER ROW CROP PESTS UNDER TRANSITION TO BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION IN TEMPERATE REGIONS

Location: Insect Control and Cotton Disease Research Unit

Title: Influence of temperature on the rate of grandlure released from boll weevil pheromone lures

Authors
item Westbrook, John
item Suh, Charles

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 31, 2012
Publication Date: May 1, 2012
Citation: Westbrook, J.K., Suh, C.P. 2012. Influence of temperature on the rate of grandlure released from boll weevil pheromone lures. Proceedings Beltwide Cotton Conference. p. 921-927.

Interpretive Summary: Although lures dosed with pheromone are effective in attracting boll weevils to traps, ambient temperatures may influence the rate of pheromone released from lures and subsequently affect the detection efficiency of traps. We examined the rate of pheromone released from three commercial lures exposed to temperatures representative of those encountered during the early- and mid-cotton production season in South Texas, where boll weevil populations persist. Pheromone release was measured daily for two weeks under laboratory conditions (70 degrees F and 85 degrees F), and approximated every two days under field conditions. Laboratory and field evaluations revealed that the influence of ambient temperatures on the amount of pheromone released from lures was similar among lure types. In general, the amount of pheromone released from lures, particularly during the first week of aging, increased with increasing temperatures. The total amount of pheromone released during the first week of aging was approximately 3 to 4 times greater than the total released during the second week of aging. Given the subtropical climate of South Texas and northeastern Mexico, our findings suggest the initial pheromone dose of lures used in these areas may need to be increased to ensure that a sufficient amount of pheromone is released during the second week of aging or lures may need to be replaced more frequently.

Technical Abstract: Although pheromone lures dosed with grandlure are effective in attracting boll weevils to traps, ambient temperatures may influence the rate of pheromone released from lures and subsequently affect the detection efficiency of traps. We examined the rate of grandlure released from three commercial lure dispensers (Hercon, Plato, and Scentry) exposed to temperatures representative of those encountered during the early- and mid-cotton production season in South Texas. Pheromone release was measured daily for two weeks under laboratory conditions (70 degrees F and 85 degrees F), and approximated every two days under field conditions. Laboratory and field evaluations revealed that the influence of ambient temperatures on the amount of pheromone released from lures, particularly during the first week of aging, increased with increasing temperatures. Overall, Scentry lures released the greatest amount of pheromone over the two-week period, but Hercon and Plato lures released more pheromone than Scentry lures during the second week of aging under warmer temperatures. The total amount of pheromone released during the first week of aging was approximately 3 to 4 times greater than the total released during the second week of aging. Given the subtropical climate of South Texas and northeastern Mexico, our findings suggest the initial grandlure dose of lures used in these areas may need to be increased to ensure that a sufficient amount of grandlure is released during the second week of aging or, alternatively, lures may need to be replaced more frequently.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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