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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MINING THE GENOME OF RHIPICEPHALUS MICROPLUS TO DEVELOP NOVEL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY AND VACCINES

Location: Tick and Biting Fly Research

Title: Anti-cattle tick vaccines: Many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge?

Authors
item Guerrero, Felix
item Miller, Robert
item Perez De Leon, Adalberto

Submitted to: International Journal for Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 2, 2012
Publication Date: April 24, 2012
Citation: Guerrero, F., Miller, R., Perez De Leon, A.A. 2012. Anti-cattle tick vaccines: Many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge? International Journal for Parasitology. 42(5):421-427.

Interpretive Summary: Arguably the world's most significant arthropod pest of cattle, control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, is critical to maximize the animal health status of cattle both in large production operations and small family farms. Pesticide resistance has developed in most regions where R. microplus thrives and the demand for alternatives has driven a surge in interest to develop and implement an anti-cattle tick vaccine-based control strategy. Several research groups have ongoing projects to develop and evaluate their antigens of choice and we present a short review of these projects and offer our opinion on what constitutes a good target antigen and vaccine and what might influence the market success of candidate vaccines.

Technical Abstract: This is an invited paper from the editor-in-chief of International Journal for Parasitology who requested a Current Opinion manuscript to discuss the status of anti-cattle tick vaccine research. Arguably the world's most significant arthropod pest of cattle, control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, is critical to maximize the animal health status of cattle both in large production operations and small family farms. Pesticide resistance has developed in most regions where R. microplus thrives and the demand for alternatives has driven a surge in interest to develop and implement an anti-cattle tick vaccine-based control strategy. Several research groups have ongoing projects to develop and evaluate their antigens of choice and we present a short review of these projects and offer our opinion on what constitutes a good target antigen and vaccine and what might influence the market success of candidate vaccines.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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