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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOP TECHNOLOGIES TO PROTECT AIR QUALITY, MAINTAIN PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY & ENHANCE USE OF MANURE FROM SOUTHN GREAT PLAINS BEEF & DAIRY AG

Location: Renewable Energy and Manure Management Research

Title: Substituting steam-flaked corn with 20% whole shelled corn in finishing diets containing 0, 15, or 30% wet distillers grains plus solubles did not affect performance and feed conversion in feedlot heifers

Authors
item Mcdaniel, M -
item Loest, Clint -
item Walker, Derrick -
item Taylor, Kim -
item Elam, Nathan -
item COLE, NOEL

Submitted to: Scientific and Technical Review
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2011
Publication Date: November 1, 2011
Citation: McDaniel, M.R., Loest, C.A., Walker, D.A., Taylor, K.M., Elam, N.A., Cole, N.A. 2011. Substituting steam-flaked corn with 20% whole shelled corn in finishing diets containing 0, 15, or 30% wet distillers grains plus solubles did not affect performance and feed conversion in feedlot heifers. Clayton Livestock Research Center, New Mexico State University. Progress Report No.111. p. 1-5

Interpretive Summary: Distillers grains are a byproduct of the bioethanol industry that are a potential valuable feed resource for livestock. Typically, in the northern Great Plains feedlot cattle are fed diets based on dry-rolled corn; whereas, in the southern Great Plains cattle tend to be fed diets based on steam flaked corn, which is more digestible and has a higher energy value than dry rolled corn. Previous feeding studies indicate that substituting wet distillers grain for dry rolled corn increases beef cattle weight gain; whereas, substituting distillers grains for steam flaked corn has no effect, or may decrease animal weight gain. This suggests that it may be possible to decrease grain processing costs in diets containing distillers grain. To test that hypothesis, we fed 36 pens of Angus-cross bred finishing steers one of 6 diets and measured feed intake, weight gain, and carcass characteristics. In 3 diets a portion (20%) of the steam flaked corn was replaced with unprocessed whole shelled corn. Diets contained 0, 15 or 30% wet distillers grains. Substituting steam flaked corn with whole shelled corn increased dry matter intake (18 vs. 17.2 lb), did not affect average daily gain or feed conversion, and decreased the percentage of cattle that grade USDA choice or higher. Increasing the concentration of WDGS tended to increase dry matter intake and decrease average daily gain, resulting in significantly poorer feed conversion (6.53,6.70, and 6.99 lb feed dry matter/lb of weight gain for 0, 15 and 30% distillers grains, respectively). Feeding distillers grains did not affect carcass traits. Based on these results it is not clear if grain processing can be decreased in finishing diets containing WDGS without affecting feedlot cattle performance. Additional studies using other forms of grain (other than whole shelled corn) are needed to confirm or refute our hypothesis.

Technical Abstract: Previous feeding studies suggest there may be an interaction between grain processing method and the feeding of wet distillers grains (WDGS) in beef cattle finishing diets, such that the growth response to feeding WDGS in beef cattle finishing diets based on dry rolled corn is greater than in steam flaked corn (SFC)-based diets. Because of this interaction, it may be possible to decrease grain processing costs by substituting a less processed grain for SFC in diets containing WDGS without adversely affecting animal performance. To that end, we fed 36 pens of Angus-cross bred heifers one of 6 diets in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Diets contained 0 or 20% whole shelled corn (WSC) with the WSC replacing SFC. Diets also contained 0, 15 or 30% corn-based WDGS. No apparent grain processing by WDGS interactions were noted. Substituting 20% of dietary SFC with WSC increased dry matter intake (18 vs. 17.2 lb), but did not affect average daily gain or feed conversion, and decreased the percentage of carcasses grading choice or higher. Increasing the concentration of WDGS tended to increase dry matter intake but, tended to decrease average daily gain, resulting in a significant adverse effect on feed conversion (6.53,6.70, and 6.99 lb feed dry matter/lb of weight gain for 0, 15 and 30% WDGS, respectively). Feeding WDGS did not affect carcass traits. Based on these results, it is not clear if grain processing can be decreased in finishing diets containing WDGS without affecting feedlot cattle performance.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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