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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL CROPS OF THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: Transplant production

Authors
item Grey, Timothy -
item Webster, Theodore

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2012
Publication Date: May 1, 2012
Citation: Grey, T.L., Webster, T.M. 2012. Transplant production. In: Russo, V.M., editor. Peppers: Botany, Production, and Uses. Oxfordshire, UK: CABI. p. 87-99.

Interpretive Summary: Book Chapter - Summary Not Required

Technical Abstract: For field pepper (Capsicum spp.) production, plants can be established from direct seed or transplants depending on the location and cultural practices for the specific pepper type grown. Direct seeding can result in slow, variable, and reduced plant stands due to variations in soil temperature, water stress, pests, weeds competition and diseases. For direct to field seeding, specialized planting equipment is used to control seed spacing and depth, soils must be uniform and level, and harvest dates will be 3 to 4 weeks later than when transplants are used. In contrast, plants established from transplants have greater yield and earlier harvest than plants established from seed. In 2008 there were over 22,000 ha of bell pepper and 10,000 ha of chile pepper harvested in the U.S. China leads the world with greater than 1.25 million ha of pepper production, and exports 50 to 100 tons of hybrid seed to the US, South Korea and other countries. Seeding pepper directly into the field is not recommended due to cost of hybrid seed and environmental conditions required for adequate germination of seeded plants. While direct pepper seeding occurs in many regions of the world, most commercial production is with the use of transplants. Most pepper is field transplanted from plants produced in greenhouses. Some of the critical factors to ensure successful transplant production are reviewed in this chapter.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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