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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Efficient Management and Use of Animal Manure to Protect Human Health and Environmental Quality

Location: Food Animal Environmental Systems Research Unit

Title: Formation of alkylaminium salts in particulate matter

Authors
item Lee, Su Anne -
item Praske, Eric -
item Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen -
item Tang, Xiaochen -
item Cocker, David -
item Silva, Philip
item Brown, Robert -

Submitted to: American Chemical Society National Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 3, 2012
Publication Date: March 28, 2012
Citation: Lee, S., Praske, E., Purvis-Roberts, K.L., Tang, X., Cocker, D.R., Silva, P.J., Brown, R.S. 2012. Formation of alkylaminium salts in particulate matter. American Chemical Society National Meeting. Abstract.

Technical Abstract: Amines in the atmosphere derive from sources, such as sewage treatment and livestock feeding. The abundance of these amines in the atmosphere makes it important to determine how amines react to form particles, specifically amine salts. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber to determine the chemical mechanism of salt formation. A Particle Into Liquid Sampler-Ion C hromatograph (PILS-IC) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of salts formed during the experiments. Reactions of the amines with oxidants, such as N2 O5 and the hydroxyl radical, under varying levels of humidity showed that diethylamine produced the highest concentration of amine salts, followed by butylamine and trimethylamine. Our findings also indicate that oxidization of the carbon side chain of the amine seemed to occur more readily in the reactions involving the hydroxyl radical instead of salt formation when N2 O5 was used. Humidity levels between 0% - 40% for the butylamine experiments produced the most salt in the dry experiment and least salt in the wet experiment.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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