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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF PERENNIAL FORAGE AND TURF GRASSES FOR THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES Title: Dissecting the genetics of rhizomatousness: Towards sustainable food, forage, and bioenergy

Authors
item Washburn, Jacob -
item Murray, Seth -
item Burson, Byron
item Jessup, Russell -

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 7, 2011
Publication Date: October 16, 2011
Citation: Washburn, J.D., Murray, S., Burson, B.L., Jessup, R. 2011. Dissecting the genetics of rhizomatousness: Towards sustainable food, forage, and bioenergy [abstract]. American Society of Agronomy Meetings, October 16-19, 2011, San Antonio, Texas. p. 221-8. 2011 CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Rhizomatousness is a key trait influencing both the perenniality and biomass partitioning of plants. Increased understanding of the genetic control of rhizome growth offers potential towards the creation of more sustainable grain, forage, and bioenergy cropping systems. It is also applicable to the advent of control methods for some of the world's most problematic weeds, notably Johnsongrass [Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers]. The sorghum genus has become a model for the identification of genes controlling rhizomatousness and perenniality. QTLs correlated with rhizome growth have previously been identified using populations derived from crosses between S. bicolor (L.) Moench. and S. propinquum (Kunth.) Hitchc. In this study we have used a population of F4 NIL's segregating for rhizomatousness to further refine a previously identified QTL region. Results and implications will be discussed.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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