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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR KEY PESTS OF PECAN AND PEACH

Location: Fruit and Nut Research

Title: The use of entomopathogenic nematodes in the US and issues related to genetic degradation

Author
item Shapiro Ilan, David

Submitted to: European Meeting in the IOBC/WPRS
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 23, 2011
Publication Date: November 1, 2011
Citation: Shapiro Ilan, D.I. 2011. The use of entomopathogenic nematodes in the US and issues related to genetic degradation. In: 13th European Meeting in the IOBC/WPRS Working Group, Insect Pathogens and Insect Parasitic Nematodes, June 19-23, 2011, Innsbruck, Austria. 66:29-32.

Interpretive Summary: Entomopathogenic nematodes, also called beneficial nematodes, are small round worms that are used as environmentally friendly bio-insecticides. Research and commercial application of entomopathogenic nematodes in North America has a long history. In the pursuit of commercial viability, there have been a number of success stories, but also quite a number of dead ends. Here we provide insight into new opportunities for entomopathogenic nematodes that are on the horizon. Some novel targets that are currently being researched include a variety of wood boring insects, weevil pests, as well as pests of pollinators. Novel application methods and formulations that are being developed will also facilitate expanded use of nematodes as microbial control agents. Advances in biocontrol using entomopathogenic nematodes will also be enhanced through fundamental studies on the microbial ecology, epizootiology, trait deterioration, population dynamics as well as basic studies on host-pathogen relationships.

Technical Abstract: Research and commercial application of entomopathogenic nematodes in North America has a long history. In the pursuit of commercial viability, there have been a number of success stories, but also quite a number of dead ends. We provide insight into new opportunities for entomopathogenic nematodes that are on the horizon. Some novel targets that are currently being researched include a variety of wood boring insects, weevil pests, as well as pests of pollinators. Novel application methods and formulations that are being developed will also facilitate expanded use of nematodes as microbial control agents. Advances in biocontrol using entomopathogenic nematodes will also be enhanced through fundamental studies on the microbial ecology, epizootiology, trait deterioration, population dynamics as well as basic studies on host-pathogen relationships.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014