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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MICROBIAL INTERACTIONS AND MANAGEMENT APPROACHES TO REDUCE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN POULTRY

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Effect of supplementation of prebiotic mannan-oligosaccharides and probiotic mixture on growth performance of broilers subjected to chronic heat stress

Authors
item Sohail, Mohammad -
item Hume, Michael
item Byrd, James
item Nisbet, David
item Ijaz, Ahmad -
item Sohail, A -
item Shabbir, M -
item Rehman, Habib -

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 6, 2012
Publication Date: August 27, 2012
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57392
Citation: Sohail, M.U., Hume, M.E., Byrd II, J.A., Nisbet, D.J., Ijaz, A., Sohail, A., Shabbir, M.Z., Rehman, H. 2012. Effect of supplementation of prebiotic mannan-oligosaccharides and probiotic mixture on growth performance of broilers subjected to chronic heat stress. Poultry Science. 91:2235-2240.

Interpretive Summary: The present study was aimed at elucidating the effects of yeast cell walls and a probiotic of beneficial bacteria on growth and intestinal development in broiler chickens kept under heat stress conditions. As expected, heat stress lowered growth, food utilization, and food consumption, as well as intestinal development. The probiotic of beneficial bacteria was able to reduce the effect of heat stress on intestinal development in chickens at 21 days of age. However, by 42 days of age, chickens given a combination of yeast cell walls and the probiotic of beneficial bacteria had better intestinal development than other heat stress treatment groups.

Technical Abstract: The present study was aimed at elucidating the effects of supplementing mannan-oligosaccharides (MOS) and probiotic mixture (PM) on growth performance, intestinal histology, and corticosterone concentrations in broilers kept under chronic heat stress (HS). Four hundred and fifty day-old chicks were divided into five treatment groups and fed a corn-soybean diet ad libitum. The temperature control (CONT) group was held at the normal ambient temperature. Heat stress broilers were held at 35 ± 2°C from d 1 to the conclusion of the study at d 42. Heat stress groups consisted of: HS-CONT fed the basal diet; HS-MOS fed the basal diet containing 0.5% MOS; HS-PM fed the basal diet containing 0.1% PM; and HS-SYN (symbiotic) fed 0.5 MOS and 0.1% PM in the basal diet. Broilers were examined at d 21 and 42 for body weight gain (BWG), feed consumption, feed efficiency, serum corticosterone concentrations, and ileal histology. The results revealed that the CONT group had higher (P < 0.01) BWG, feed efficiency, and feed consumption on d 21 and 42 compared to the HS-CONT group. The HS-MOS had higher (P < 0.05) BWG and FGR compared to the HS-CONT group. On d 21 and 42, the HS-CONT group had higher (P < 0.05) serum corticosterone concentrations compared to the CONT and supplemented groups. The CONT group had higher (P < 0.05) villus height, width, surface area, and crypt depth compared to the HS-CONT group. On d 21, the HS-PM had higher villus width and surface area compared to HS-CONT group. Whereas on d 42, the HS-SYN had higher villus width and crypt depth compared to the HS-CONT group. These results showed that chronic HS reduces broilers production performance, intestinal microarchitecture, and increases adrenal hormone concentration. Also, supplementation of MOS prebiotic and a probiotic can partially lessen these changes.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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