Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NUTRITION, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND SARCOPENIA IN THE ELDERLY Title: Assessment of analytical methods used to measure changes in body composition in the elderly and recommendations for their use in phase II clinical trials

Authors
item Lustgarten, Michael S. -
item Fielding, Roger A. -

Submitted to: Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 30, 2010
Publication Date: May 5, 2011
Citation: Lustgarten, M., Fielding, R. 2011. Assessment of analytical methods used to measure changes in body composition in the elderly and recommendations for their use in phase II clinical trials. Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging. 15(5):368-375. PMID:21528163.

Interpretive Summary: It is estimated that in the next 20 years, the number of people older than 65 years of age will rise from 40 to 70 million, and will account for 19% of the total U.S. population. Age-related decreases in muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, have been shown to be related to functional limitation, frailty and an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, with an increasing elderly population, interventions that can improve muscle mass content and/or function are essential. However, analytical techniques used for measurement of muscle mass in young subjects may not be valid for use in the elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the applied specificity and accuracy of methods that are commonly used for measurement of muscle mass in aged subjects, and, to propose specific recommendations for the use of body composition measures in phase II clinical trials of function-promoting anabolic therapies.

Technical Abstract: It is estimated that in the next 20 years, the amount of people greater than 65 years of age will rise from 40 to 70 million, and will account for 19% of the total population. Age-related decreases in muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, have been shown to be related to functional limitation, frailty and an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, with an increasing elderly population, interventions that can improve muscle mass content and/or function are essential. However, analytical techniques used for measurement of muscle mass in young subjects may not be valid for use in the elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the applied specificity and accuracy of methods that are commonly used for measurement of muscle mass in aged subjects, and, to propose specific recommendations for the use of body composition measures in phase II clinical trials of function-promoting anabolic therapies.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page