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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Linking Foods, Behavior and Metabolism to Promote a Healthy Body Weight

Location: Obesity and Metabolism Research Unit

Title: Effects of industrially produced trans fat on markers of systemic inflammation: evidence from a randomized trial in women

Authors
item Bendensen, Nathalie -
item Stender, Steen -
item Szecsi, Pal -
item Pedersen, Steen -
item Basu, Samar -
item Hellgren, Lars -
item NEWMAN, JOHN
item Larsen, Thomas -
item Haugaard, Steen -
item Astrup, Arne -

Submitted to: Journal of Lipid Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 20, 2011
Publication Date: July 27, 2011
Repository URL: http://www.jlr.org/content/52/10/1821.long
Citation: Bendensen, N.T., Stender, S., Szecsi, P.B., Pedersen, S.B., Basu, S., Hellgren, L.I., Newman, J.W., Larsen, T.M., Haugaard, S.B., Astrup, A. 2011. Effects of industrially produced trans fat on markers of systemic inflammation: evidence from a randomized trial in women. Journal of Lipid Research. doi 10.1194/jlr.M014738.

Interpretive Summary: In cross-sectional studies of populations, the intake of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA), components of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, has been positively associated to systemic markers of low-grade inflammation and dysfunction in the cells lining blood vessels. However, results from direct intervention studies remain inconclusive. The current study was designed to examine the effect of a high intake of TFA on systemic biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, adipose tissue expression of adipokines and content of ceramide and urinary markers of oxidative stress. To accomplish this task, 52 healthy overweight postmenopausal women participated in a 16-weeks double-blind parallel intervention study where they were randomized to receive either partially hydrogenated soybean oil providing 15.7 g per day of TFA or a control oil where TFA was replaced by mainly oleic and palmitic acid. After 16 weeks, TFA intake increased baseline-adjusted serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) (P= 0.002), plasma soluble TNF receptors 1 and 2 (P<0.001 and P=0.02, respectively). Serum C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL) 6 and adiponectin, adipose tissue mRNA expression of IL6, IL8, TNFa and adiponectin and ceramide, and the urinary marker of oxidative stress 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2a were not affected by the dietary intervention. In conclusion, this dietary trial shows that the mechanisms linking dietary TFA to cardiovascular disease is likely to involve induction of low-grade systemic inflammation although this is not mirrored in adipose tissue mRNA expression within 16 weeks.

Technical Abstract: Background: Intake of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) has been positively associated to systemic markers of low-grade inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in cross-sectional studies, but results from intervention studies are inconclusive. Objective: To examine the effect of a high intake of TFA on systemic biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, adipose tissue expression of adipokines and content of ceramide and urinary markers of oxidative stress. Design: A 16-weeks double-blind parallel intervention study where 52 healthy overweight postmenopausal women were randomized to receive either partially hydrogenated soybean oil providing 15.7 g per day of TFA or a control oil where TFA was replaced by mainly oleic and palmitic acid. Results: After 16 weeks TFA intake increased baseline-adjusted serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a by 12 % (95% confidence interval (CI): 5 - 20%; P= 0.002) more in the TFA group compared to controls. Plasma soluble TNF receptors 1 and 2 were also increased by TFA [155 (CI: 63 - 247) pg/ml; P<0.001 and 480 (CI: 72 - 887) pg/ml; P=0.02, respectively]. Serum C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL) 6 and adiponectin and adipose tissue mRNA expression of IL6, IL8, TNFa and adiponectin and ceramide content were not affected by the dietary intervention, neither was the urinary marker of oxidative stress 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2a. Conclusions: This dietary trial shows that the mechanisms linking dietary TFA to cardiovascular disease is likely to involve induction of low-grade systemic inflammation although this is not mirrored in adipose tissue mRNA expression within 16 weeks.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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