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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY, IDENTIFICATION AND RISK-ASSESSMENT OF BIOCONTROL AGENTS FOR SUPPRESSION OF SOUTH AMERICAN INVASIVE WEEDS AND INSECTS IN THE U.S. Title: The leafmining Leurocephala schinusae (Lepidoptera Gracillariidae): Not suitable for the biological control of Schinus terebinthifolius (Sapindales Anacardiaceae)in continental USA

Authors
item Mc Kay, Fernando -
item Oleiro, Marina -
item Diniz Vitorino, Marcelo -
item Wheeler, Gregory

Submitted to: Biocontrol Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 3, 2012
Publication Date: February 15, 2012
Citation: Mc Kay, F., Oleiro, M.I., Diniz Vitorino, M., Wheeler, G.S. 2012. The leafmining Leurocephala schinusae (Lepidoptera Gracillariidae): Not suitable for the biological control of Schinus terebinthifolius (Sapindales Anacardiaceae)in continental USA. Biocontrol Science and Technology. 22(4):477-489. DOI: 10.1080/09583157.2012.664618.

Interpretive Summary: A leaf-mining moth was studied to assess its suitability as a biological control agent of Brazilian peppertree (Cashew family), a serious environmental weed in the USA and elsewhere in the world. The host range was determined by laboratory studies conducted in Argentina and USA, and by sampling foliage of Brazilian peppertree and other Cashew family species in north-eastern Argentina. In the laboratory, the moth laid eggs on most of the tested plant species was able to complete development to adult stage on a small number of plants. In the field, leaf mines were found not only on Brazilian peppertree but on other South American Cashew plant species. In conclusion, the moth will not be considered for the biological control of Brazilian peppertree in the continental U.S., although its utilization in other infested areas, such as Hawaii and Australia should be further discussed.

Technical Abstract: Leurocephala schinusae Davis & Mc Kay (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) was studied to assess its suitability as a biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), a serious environmental weed in the USA and elsewhere in the world. The host range was determined by laboratory adult no-choice oviposition (Argentina and USA) and larval development tests (USA), and by sampling foliage of S. terebinthifolius and six other native Anacardiaceae species in north-eastern Argentina. In the laboratory, most of the tested species were accepted for oviposition. Development of complete mines, pupae and adults was registered on R. aromatica, R. copallinum, S. molle and S. terebinthifolius. The realized host-range of L. schinusae included four Schinus and one Astronium species. In conclusion, L. schinusae will not be considered for the biological control of S. terebinthifolius in the continental US, although its utilization in other infested areas, such as Hawaii and Australia should be further discussed.

Last Modified: 11/1/2014
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