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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NONCHEMICAL PEST CONTROL AND ENHANCED SUGAR BEET GERMPLASM VIA TRADITIONAL AND MOLECULAR TECHNOLOGIES

Location: Sugarbeet Research

Title: Pathogenic and Phylogenetic analysis of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugarbeet in Michigan and Minnesota

Authors
item Webb, Kimberly
item Covey, Paul
item Hanson, Linda

Submitted to: Journal of Sugar Beet Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 2, 2011
Publication Date: March 30, 2012
Citation: Webb, K.M., Covey, P.A., Hanson, L.E. 2012. Pathogenic and Phylogenetic analysis of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugarbeet in Michigan and Minnesota. Journal of Sugar Beet Research. 49(1&2):38-56.

Interpretive Summary: Fusarium yellows of sugar beet, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, causes significant reductions in root yield, sucrose percentage, and juice purity. Fusarium yellows is an emerging disease in Michigan and Minnesota production regions and while resistance provides some control, growers have reported failures when resistant varieties are grown in different parts of the country, potentially due to the variability of local F. oxysporum populations. F. oxysporum isolates from Michigan and Minnesota can be clasified into three groups regardless of ability to cause disease on sugarbeet. Screening resistant germplasm against representative isolates from these three groups may aid in breeding for resistance in each sugarbeet production region.

Technical Abstract: Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend:FR. f. sp. betae (Stewart) Snyd & Hans, can lead to significant reduction in root yield sucrose percentage, and juice purity. Fusarium yellows has become increasingly common in both Michigan and Minnesota sugarbeet production areas, and while genetic resistance provides some control, growers have reported failures when resistant varieties are grown in different parts of the country, potentially due to the variability of local F. oxysporum populations. Previous research has demonstrated that F. oxysporum collected from symptomatic sugarbeet throughout the production region of Michigan and Minnesota. These isolates were characterized utilizing pathogenicity and phylogenetic analysis. While the F. oxsporum popultion is highly polyphyletic and most likely cannot be classified into distinct races, phylogenetic clades can be described, which may aid in selecting resistant lines for particular production regions.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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