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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: THE TOXICITY OF PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOID-CONTAINING PLANTS AND OTHER HEPATOTOXIC AND NEUROTOXIC PLANTS Title: Seasonal variation in pyrrolizidine alkaloid concentration and plant development in Senecio madagascariensis poir. (Asteraceae) in Brazil

Authors
item Karam, F.S. -
item Haraguchi, M -
item Gardner, Dale

Submitted to: Poisoning by Plants, Mycotoxins, and Related Toxins
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 18, 2010
Publication Date: May 1, 2011
Citation: Karam, F.S.C., Haraguchi, M., Gardner, D.R. 2011. Seasonal variation in pyrrolizidine alkaloid concentration and plant development in Senecio madagascariensis poir. (Asteraceae) in Brazil. In: Riet-Correa, F., Pfister, J., Schild, A.L., Wierenga, T., editors. Poisoning by Plants, Mycotoxins, and Related Toxins. Cambridge, MA: CAB International. p. 179-85.

Interpretive Summary: Pyrollizidine alkaloid (PA) concentration studies were conducted in July and October 2007 and January and May 2008 in Grande do Sul, Brazil. During these studies PA concentrations of S. madagascariensis plant material were measured. This chapter presents the results of seasonal variation in PA concentration and plant development in this plant during that time.

Technical Abstract: This chapter presents the results of studies conducted in the municipality of Eldorado do Sul, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in July and October 2007 and January and May 2008 to measure the pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) concentrations of S. madagascariensis plant material (including leaves, flowers and stems) in different phenological growth stages (sprouts, young and adult leaves (vegetative phenophases), flower buds, flowers, unripe and ripe fruits, seed dispersal (reproductive phenophases), and death of leaves) throughout the year (winter, spring, summer and autumn). Observations were also recorded concerning the phenological variation in plants during the year. Twelve PAs were detected from the aerial parts (stems, leaves and flowers) of S. madagascariensis collected in southern Brazil. The alkaloid profile was similar to that reported from plants in Australia and Hawaii. The alkaloids were macrocyclic diesters of retronecine and otonecine bases and would be presumed to cause poisoning in cattle. The flowers contained the highest total PA in spring.

Last Modified: 11/21/2014
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