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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Soft-bodied Collops likes soft bodies

Authors
item Ellsworth, Peter -
item Mostafa, Ayman -
item Brown, Lydia -
item Naranjo, Steven

Submitted to: University of Arizona Cooperative Extension
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: July 5, 2011
Publication Date: July 5, 2011
Repository URL: http://ag.arizona.edu/crops/cotton/files/CollopsVFlo.pdf
Citation: Ellsworth, P., Mostafa, A., Brown, L., Naranjo, S.E. 2011. Soft-bodied Collops likes soft bodies. Field Crop IPM Shorts, Cooperative Extension, University of Arizona, Tucson, Extension Fact Sheets. 7/2011.

Interpretive Summary: Many kinds of insect natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) inhabit crop fields in Arizona and can have a large negative impact on several pest insect species that also infest these crops. One of the more common predatory beetles found in cotton, alfalfa and other crops is the Collops beetle. They belong to a group called soft-winged flower beetles and as their name implies they are not hard and shell-like as is typical of most beetles. They feed on a wide range of prey, including whiteflies, plant bugs and small caterpillars. This season, they are particularly abundant in cotton fields throughout the state and are no doubt exerting important control on a number of pest species. This extension circular summarizes some of the biology and ecology of these beetles and emphasizes the benefits they can provide in pest control. Producers are encouraged to use selective insecticides for controlling pests if insecticides are required. This will conserve important predators like the Collops beetles and many other beneficial species.

Technical Abstract: Many kinds of insect natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) inhabit crop fields in Arizona and can have a large negative impact on several pest insect species that also infest these crops. One of the more common predatory beetles found in cotton, alfalfa and other crops is the Collops beetle. They belong to a group called soft-winged flower beetles and as their name implies they are not hard and shell-like as is typical of most beetles. They feed on a wide range of prey, including whiteflies, plant bugs and small caterpillars. This season, they are particularly abundant in cotton fields throughout the state and are no doubt exerting important control on a number of pest species. This extension circular summarizes some of the biology and ecology of these beetles and emphasizes the benefits they can provide in pest control. Producers are encouraged to use selective insecticides for controlling pests if insecticides are required. This will conserve important predators like the Collops beetles and many other beneficial species.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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