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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Conservation Systems Research for Improving Evnironmental Quality and Producer Profitability

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: Do nitrogen fertilizer rate and application timing make a difference in corn production?

Authors
item Ortiz, Brenda -
item Burmester, Charles -
item Balkcom, Kipling

Submitted to: Agricultural Experiment Station Publication
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: April 4, 2011
Publication Date: April 11, 2011
Citation: Ortiz, B.V., Burmester, C., Balkcom, K.S. 2011. Do nitrogen fertilizer rate and application timing make a difference in corn production?. Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Available: http://www.aces.edu/timelyinfo/Ag%20Soil/2011/April/Corn April2011.pdf.

Interpretive Summary: The high prices of nitrogen fertilizer have forced corn producers to consider strategies to increase nitrogen use efficiency. Improving nitrogen management in corn could involve the implementation of several management strategies. Side dressing, adjustment of nitrogen levels according to the site’s yield potential, and soil water availability on nitrogen uptake are important considerations before deciding the in-season nitrogen strategy. A two-year study conducted by Auburn Univ. scientists and ARS researchers in Auburn, AL on nitrogen application for corn conducted at two different locations are presented here. Although two years of data are not sufficient to determine the best nitrogen management strategy by location, the data provide baseline information on factors that might influence corn response to nitrogen application.

Technical Abstract: The high prices of nitrogen fertilizer have forced corn producers to consider strategies to increase nitrogen use efficiency. Improving nitrogen management in corn could involve the implementation of several management strategies. Side dressing, adjustment of nitrogen levels according to the site’s yield potential, and soil water availability on nitrogen uptake are important considerations before deciding the in-season nitrogen strategy. Results from a two-year study on nitrogen application for corn conducted at two different locations in Alabama are presented here. Although two years of data are not sufficient to determine the best nitrogen management strategy by location, the data provide baseline information on factors that might influence corn response to nitrogen application.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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