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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF SUBTROPICAL AND TROPICAL ORNAMENTAL GERMPLASM Title: Molecular markers and conservation of plant species in Latin America: the case of Phaedranassa viridflora (Amaryllidaceae)

Authors
item Oleas, Nora -
item Meerow, Alan
item Francisco-Ortega, Javier -

Submitted to: Botanical Review
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 11, 2012
Publication Date: August 15, 2013
Citation: Oleas, N.H., Meerow, A.W., Francisco-Ortega, J. 2013. Molecular markers and conservation of plant species in Latin America: the case of Phaedranassa viridflora (Amaryllidaceae). Botanical Review. DOI: DOI 10.1007/s12229-013-9125-8 (web: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12229-013-9125-8).

Interpretive Summary: Microsatellites are molecular markers with great potential for investigating genetic structure of populations. This information is valuable for generating effective conservation plans. We studied the endangered Phaedranassa viridiflora (Amaryllidaceae) to show the utility of microsatellite markers for conservation purposes. Phaedranassa viridiflora is the only species of the genus with yellow flowers. Our results provided the first evidence of natural hybridization between P. viridiflora and P. dubia in northern Ecuador, at Pululahua crater. The central-southern populations do not show hybridization with other species of the genus. Genetic diversity was highest in the Pululahua population. Central and southern populations have a higher proportion of clones than Pululahua. Bayesian and cluster analysis suggest that the yellow flower type evolved at least three times along the Ecuadorean Andes. The results of this study show that microsatellite markers are a valuable tool to estimate genetic diversity patterns.

Technical Abstract: Microsatellites are molecular markers with great potential for investigating genetic structure of populations. This information is valuable for generating effective conservation plans. We studied the endemic and endangered Phaedranassa viridiflora (Amaryllidaceae) to show the utility of microsatellite markers for conservation purposes. Phaedranassa viridiflora is the only species of the genus with yellow flowers. Our results provided the first evidence of natural hybridization between P. viridiflora and P. dubia in northern Ecuador, at Pululahua crater. The central-southern populations do not show hybridization with other species of the genus. Genetic diversity was highest in the Pululahua population. Central and southern populations have a higher proportion of clones than Pululahua. Bayesian and cluster analysis suggest that the yellow flower type evolved at least three times along the Ecuadorean Andes. The results of this study show that microsatellite markers are a valuable tool to estimate genetic diversity patterns.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014