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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Development and Use of Mite Resistance Traits in Honey Bee Breeding

Location: Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics, and Physiology Research

Title: Using Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms and Genetic Mapping to find Candidate Genes that Influence Varroa-Specific Hygiene

Authors
item Tsuruda, J -
item Harris, Jeffrey
item Bourgeois, Lanie
item Danka, Robert
item Hunt, G -

Submitted to: American Bee Journal
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 6, 2011
Publication Date: May 15, 2011
Citation: Tsuruda, J.M., Harris, J.W., Bourgeois, A.L., Danka, R.G., Hunt, G.J. 2011. Using Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms and Genetic Mapping to find Candidate Genes that Influence Varroa-Specific Hygiene. American Bee Journal. 151(5):511.

Technical Abstract: Varroa-sensitive hygienic (VSH) behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa mite populations in bee hives. A study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) that influence VSH so that resistance genes could be identified. Crosses between high- and low-VSH lines resulted in a backcross family. Individual workers were tagged with numbered disks and evaluated for their VSH behavior in a mite-infested observation hive. Bees that uncapped or removed mite-infested pupae were identified. Probes for 1,536 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes were used to analyze the genomic DNA of worker bees in this backcross family. The genotypes for 1,348 informative SNPs were used to construct a high-resolution genetic map using JoinMap software and to compare genotypes of individuals that performed VSH behavior to those that did not perform the behavior. Interval mapping using MapQTL software identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score=3.17) and a suggestive QTL on chromosome 3(LOD=2.16). The QTL region on chromosome 9 contains relatively few genes and the center of this region contains a dopamine receptor. This type of dopamine receptor has been previously shown to be required for olfactory and aversive learning, which are necessary for identifying mites within brood cells.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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