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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BEE DIVERSITY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE BEE POLLINATION SYSTEMS

Location: Pollinating Insects-- Biology, Management and Systematics Research

Title: Osmia species (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae) from the southeastern United States with modified facial hairs: taxonomy, host plants, and conservation status

Authors
item Rightmyer, Molly -
item Deyrup, Mark -
item Ascher, John -
item Griswold, Terry

Submitted to: ZooKeys
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2011
Publication Date: November 21, 2011
Citation: Rightmyer, M., Deyrup, M., Ascher, J.S., Griswold, T.L. 2011. Osmia species (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae) from the southeastern United States with modified facial hairs: taxonomy, host plants, and conservation status. ZooKeys. 148:257-278.

Interpretive Summary: This paper highlights two species of Osmia (mason bees) found in the southeastern United States. Both species are unique among North American Osmia for the special form of the hairs found on their faces, which are short, straight, and function to trap pollen from flowers where the anthers are positioned to deposit pollen from above. One species, Osmia calaminthae, is newly described and named after its host plant, Calamintha ashei. This species has only been found in Highlands County, Florida. We provide illustrations of the host plant, and photographs of the bee collecting pollen on its face from this plant. The second bee, Osmia conjunctoides, was originally thought to be a subspecies of a more widely distributed bee found throughout much of the United States, Osmia subfasciata; however, we provide new diagnostic features for differentiating Osmia conjunctoides from Osmia subfasciata, and recognize the former as a full species.

Technical Abstract: We describe females and males of Osmia (Melanosmia) calaminthae, new species, an apparent floral specialist on Calamintha ashei (Lamiaceae). Females of O. calaminthae have short, erect, simple facial hairs. The species is currently only known from sandy scrub at a number of sites in the southern Lake Wales Ridge in Highlands County, Florida. We provide diagnostic information for Osmia (Diceratosmia) conjunctoides Robertson, new status, another bee with specialized hairs for collecting pollen from nototribic flowers; we also synonymize O. (Diceratosmia) subfasciata miamiensis Mitchell with O. conjunctoides, new synonymy.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014