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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCING ANIMAL WELL-BEING, IMMUNOCOMPETENCE, AND PERFORMANCE IN SWINE AND BEEF CATTLE Title: Camelina meal supplementation to beef cattle: I. Effects on performance, DMI, and acute-phase protein response of feeder steers following transport

Authors
item Cappellozza, Bruno -
item Cooke, Reinaldo -
item Trevisanuto, Cesar -
item Tabacow, Victor -
item Bohnert, David -
item Dailey, Jeffery
item Carroll, Jeffery

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 10, 2011
Publication Date: August 11, 2011
Citation: Cappellozza, B.I., Cooke, R.F., Trevisanuto, C., Tabacow, V.D., Bohnert, D.W., Dailey, J.W., Carroll, J.A. 2011. Camelina meal supplementation to beef cattle: I. Effects on performance, DMI, and acute-phase protein response of feeder steers following transport. Proceedings of the Western Section, American Society of Animal Science, June 21-23, 2011, Miles City, MT. p. 1-4.

Interpretive Summary: Camelina meal, a byproduct from the mechanical processing of the camelina seeds for oil extraction, may contain up to 20% oil with the majority of the fatty acid content as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Scientists theorized that camelina meal can serve as a sustainable nutritional alternative to modulate the acute-phase response in cattle subjected to stress of management. Based on this rationale, a collaborative study was conducted by scientists from Oregon State University's Eastern Oregon Agricultural Resaerch Center in Burns, OR, and the ARS' Livestock Issues Research Unit in Lubbock, TX, to evaluate the potential effects of supplementing beef cattle diets with camelina meal as a source of PUFAs on the acute phase response stimulated by transportation and subsequent performance. The specific objective was to evaluate performance, physiological, and health parameters of feeder steers supplemented with camelina meal prior to and/or after transport to the feedyard. Results from this study indicated that camelina meal supplementation alleviated the acute-phase protein response stimulated by transport, but did not benefit performance of feeder steers. These results will be of interest to scientists in academia, industry, and government agencies conducting research in the areas of stress regulation, the acute phase response in cattle, and cattle performance and well-being.

Technical Abstract: Sixty Angus x Hereford steers were ranked by BW on d -28 of the study and allocated to 20 drylot pens which were randomly assigned to receive: 1) supplement containing (as-fed basis) 84% corn, 14% soybean meal, and 2% mineral mix (CO) offered during preconditioning (PC; d -28 to 0) and feedlot receiving (FR; d 1 to 29), 2) supplement containing (as-fed basis) 70% corn, 28% camelina meal, and 2% mineral mix (CAM) offered during PC and FR, 3) CAM offered during PC and CO offered during FR, 4) CO offered during PC and CAM offered during FR. Treatments were offered daily at a rate of 2.20 and 2.04 kg of DM/steer for CO and CAM, respectively. Alfalfa-grass hay was offered ad libitum during the study. On d 0, steers were loaded into a commercial livestock trailer, transported for 24 h, and returned to the research facility (d 1). Total DMI was evaluated daily, and shrunk BW was collected on d -31, 1, and 30 for ADG calculation. Blood samples were collected on d 0 (prior to loading), 1 (immediately upon arrival), 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 29 for determination of plasma cortisol and haptoglobin. Rectal temperatures were recorded concurrently with blood sampling on d 0, 1, 4, and 7. During PC, CAM steers tended to have reduced (P = 0.10) ADG compared to CO (0.26 vs. 0.37 kg/d, respectively). No treatment effects were detected (P > 0.16) for FR and total ADG. Steers receiving CAM during PC had reduced total DMI during PC and FR compared to CO cohorts (3.07 vs. 3.35% of BW during PC, and 3.20 vs. 3.35% of BW during FR, respectively). Steers receiving CAM during PC had reduced mean haptoglobin concentrations vs. CO cohorts on d 0 and 1 (1.64 vs. 1.79 absorbance @ 450 nm × 100, respectively). Steers receiving CAM during FR had reduced (P = 0.02) mean haptoglobin and rectal temperatures during FR compared to CO cohorts (1.69 vs. 2.02 absorbance @ 450 nm × 100 of haptoglobin, and 39.05 vs. 39.14 degrees C for temperature, respectively). In conclusion, camelina meal supplementation alleviated the acute-phase protein response stimulated by transport, but did not benefit performance of feeder steers.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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