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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPACT OF EARLY DIETARY FACTORS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure body composition in infants and children

Authors
item Andres, Aline -
item Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio -
item BADGER, THOMAS

Submitted to: Obesity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 13, 2011
Publication Date: October 1, 2011
Citation: Andres, A., Gomez-Acevedo, H., Badger, T.M. 2011. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure body composition in infants and children. Obesity. 19(10):2089-2095.

Interpretive Summary: Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (QMR) is being used in human adults to obtain measures of total body fat (FM). The current study assessed a device specially designed for infants and children. Body composition of 113 infants and children was measured using dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA), air displacement plethysmography (ADP) and QMR. Results were compared with gold standards. Our results suggest that the pediatric QMR with appropriate mathematical adjustment provides an accurate and precise method for assessing FM longitudinally in infants and in children weighing up to 50 kg.

Technical Abstract: Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (QMR) is being used in human adults to obtain measures of total body fat (FM) with high precision. The current study assessed a device specially designed to accommodate infants and children between 3 and 50 kg (EchoMRI-AH™). Body composition of 113 infants and children (3.3-49.9 kg) was assessed using dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA), air displacement plethysmography (ADP, PeaPod® for infants = 8 kg and BodPod® for children = 6 y) and QMR. Results were compared with the deuterium oxide dilution technique (D2O) and a four-compartment model (4-C). The percentages of compliance were: 98% QMR; 75% DXA; 94% BodPod®; and 95% PeaPod®. Although QMR precision was high (coefficient of variation = 1.42%), it overestimated FM approximately 10% compared to the 4-C model and underestimated FM by approximately 4% compared to the deuterium method in children = 6 y. QMR was less concordant with 4-C or D2O models for infants = 8 kg. Thus, a piece-wise defined model for mathematically fitting the QMR data to the D2O data was employed and this adjustment improved the accuracy relative to D2O and 4-C for infants. Our results suggest that the pediatric QMR with appropriate mathematical adjustment provides an accurate and precise method for assessing FM longitudinally in infants and in children weighing up to 50 kg.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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