Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Develop Stress-Resistant Dry Bean Germplasm and Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Edible Legumes

Location: Vegetable and Forage Crops Production Research

Title: Recreating and Analyzing An F2 Population Similar to the One Resulting from the Cross Dorado X G19833, But Without Segregation at B

Authors
item Bassett, Mark -
item Miklas, Phillip
item Caldas, Gina -
item Blair, Matthew -

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: March 5, 2011
Publication Date: April 5, 2011
Citation: Bassett, M., Miklas, P.N., Caldas, G., Blair, M. 2011. RECREATING AND ANALYZING AN F2 POPULATION SIMILAR TO THE ONE RESULTING FROM THE CROSS DORADO X G19833, BUT WITHOUT SEGREGATION AT B . Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. 54: 52-53.

Interpretive Summary: In common bean, seed coat pattern can be expressed by several genes: P, T, C, and J (Bassett, 2007), but in this paper only the C locus will be considered. There is also a dominant gene R for (oxblood) red seed coats, which is very tightly linked to C, forming a ‘complex C locus.’ The cu gene expresses cartridge buff (pale beige) seed coat color that cannot be modified (u = unchangeable) by the three principal color modifying genes: G for yellow brown, B for mineral brown, and V for blue to black color. A fourth color modifying gene Rk can express with cu, but most of the color expressing alleles at Rk are recessive and Rk itself has no color expression. In genotypes with pattern expressed at C, the type of pattern is typically indicated by a superscript. For example, Cst indicates a seed that expresses cartridge buff over all the seed coat except for stripes, which express the color coded by the full seed coat genotype when free of cu effects. If the color were yellow brown, the full seed coat color genotype would be P T C J G b v Rk. In this paper where the materials presented do not differ or segregate genetically at certain genes, those genes will not be indicated in the seed coat genotypes presented. Specifically, the gene symbols P, T, and J will always be omitted because both parents carry the dominant gene at those loci. A brief summary of seed coat genetics is given in the first of two previous companion papers.

Technical Abstract: In common bean, seed coat pattern can be expressed by several genes: P, T, C, and J (Bassett, 2007), but in this paper only the C locus will be considered. There is also a dominant gene R for (oxblood) red seed coats, which is very tightly linked to C, forming a ‘complex C locus.’ The cu gene expresses cartridge buff (pale beige) seed coat color that cannot be modified (u = unchangeable) by the three principal color modifying genes: G for yellow brown, B for mineral brown, and V for blue to black color. A fourth color modifying gene Rk can express with cu, but most of the color expressing alleles at Rk are recessive and Rk itself has no color expression. In genotypes with pattern expressed at C, the type of pattern is typically indicated by a superscript. For example, Cst indicates a seed that expresses cartridge buff over all the seed coat except for stripes, which express the color coded by the full seed coat genotype when free of cu effects. If the color were yellow brown, the full seed coat color genotype would be P T C J G b v Rk. In this paper where the materials presented do not differ or segregate genetically at certain genes, those genes will not be indicated in the seed coat genotypes presented. Specifically, the gene symbols P, T, and J will always be omitted because both parents carry the dominant gene at those loci. A brief summary of seed coat genetics is given in the first of two previous companion papers.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page