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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION, CONVERSION, AND IMPROVEMENT OF COMMON BEAN GERMPLASM

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Field and Greenhouse Evaluation of Bean Germplasm for Root Rot and Other Diseases in New York, 2010

Authors
item Abawai, G -
item PORCH, TIMOTHY
item Kelly, J -

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: March 25, 2011
Publication Date: March 25, 2011
Citation: Abawai, G.S., Porch Clay, T.G., Kelly, J.D. 2011. Field and greenhouse evaluation of bean germplasm for root rot and other deseases in New York, 2010. Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. 54:142-143.

Interpretive Summary: Root rot is a significant production constraint in beans worldwide in both temperate and tropical soils leading to complete crop loss under severe conditions. Two trials were conducted on common bean lines under root rot conditions in the field at the Cornell’s Vegetable Research Farm near Geneva, NY which is heavily infested with bean root pathogens and in a follow-up greenhouse test. A total of 21 bean breeding lines and varieties: 10 RR breeding lines provided by USDA-ARS (Mayaguez, PR); nine varieties and breeding lines provided by Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI); and 2 controls, Pink panther and CLRK, were evaluated in both trials. The greenhouse and field results indicate significant differences in emergence, root rot severity, above ground biomass, root biomass, vigor, and common bacterial blight resistance among the materials tested. The resistant breeding lines will be used for further investigation, and for potential release and use in breeding programs for the development of root rot resistant varieties.

Technical Abstract: Root rot is a significant production constraint in beans worldwide in both temperate and tropical soils leading to complete crop loss under severe conditions. Two trials were conducted on common bean lines under root rot conditions in the field at the Cornell’s Vegetable Research Farm near Geneva, NY which is heavily infested with bean root pathogens and in a follow-up greenhouse test. A total of 21 bean lines: 10 RR lines provided by USDA-ARS (Mayaguez, PR); nine breeding lines provided by Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI); and 2 controls, Pink panther and CLRK, were evaluated in both trials. The greenhouse and field results indicate significant differences in emergence, root rot severity, above ground biomass, root biomass, vigor, and common bacterial blight resistance among the materials tested. The resistant breeding lines will be used for further investigation and potential release.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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