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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION, CONVERSION, AND IMPROVEMENT OF COMMON BEAN GERMPLASM Title: Comparison of Choice Versus No-Choice Tests of a Dry Bean Ibl Population for Resistance to Potato Leafhopper

Authors
item Brisco, E -
item Porch, Timothy
item Kelly, J -

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: March 25, 2011
Publication Date: March 25, 2011
Citation: Brisco, E.I., Porch Clay, T.G., Kelly, J.D. 2011. Comparison of choice versus no-choice tests of a dry bean RIL population for resistance to potato leafhopper. Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. 54:88-89.

Interpretive Summary: The temperate potato leafhopper (PLH) is currently a major insect pest of dry bean in Michigan. Insect studies can be conducted under choice, or natural infestation, and no-choice, or manual infestation, conditions. Choice and no-choice tests can be useful in identifying the nature of insect resistance. In this study, resistance to PLH was evaluated in Michigan using a dry bean population generated from Matterhorn, a susceptible Michigan commercial variety, from a cross with EMP 507, a variety developed by CIAT for resistance to the tropical leafhopper. Parallel choice and no-choice tests were assessed for PLH feeding damage in the field in 2009 and 2010. Two plant response indices to PLH damage, leaf curl and leaf burn, were evaluated. Both indices were found to be significantly associated with genetic effects. Leaf curl was normally distributed in both choice and no-choice tests; however, the majority of lines showed tolerance to leaf burn. No-choice tests successfully controlled for annual environmental variation in PLH predation, while choice test scores varied dramatically for both indices over the two years.

Technical Abstract: The temperate potato leafhopper (PLH), Empoasca fabae, is currently a major insect pest of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Michigan. Choice and no-choice tests are commonly used in insect resistance breeding programs in order to control for a number of factors, and can be useful in identifying the nature of insect resistance. Resistance to a pest can be the result of antibiosis, antixenosis or tolerance mechanisms. In this study, resistance to PLH was evaluated in Michigan using a dry bean inbred line population generated from a single backcross to Matterhorn, a susceptible Michigan commercial variety, from a cross with EMP 507, a line developed by CIAT for resistance to the tropical leafhopper, E. kraemeri. Parallel choice and no-choice tests were assessed for PLH feeding damage in the field in 2009 and 2010. All damage-related indices were found to be significantly affected by genotypic effects (p<0.05). Leaf curl was normally distributed in both choice and no-choice tests; however, leaf burn was found to be left-skewed in the choice test with the majority of lines having low scores (0-1). No-choice tests successfully controlled for annual environmental variation in PLH predation as there were no significant differences in the no-choice tests between 2009 and 2010 for leaf burn or leaf curl, while choice test scores vary dramatically for all indices.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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