Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ASTRAGALUS AND OXYTROPIS POISONING IN LIVESTOCK

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: Poisonous plants and plant toxins that are likely to contaminate hay and other prepared feeds in the western United States

Authors
item Stegelmeier, Bryan
item Panter, Kip

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Repository URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.2111/Rangelands-D-11-00054.1
Citation: Stegelmeier, B.L., Panter, K.E. 2012. Poisonous plants that are likely to contaminate hay and prepared feed in the western United States. Rangelands. 34(2): 2-11.

Interpretive Summary: When alternative forages are available, grazing animals generally avoid eating poisonous plants. However, when toxic plants are included in prepared feed and hay, they are often consumed and they can poison animals. Alternatively, some normally safe forages can under certain conditions, produce and accumulate toxins and poison livestock. As poisoning often results in fatal or costly debilitating disease, identifying toxic plants and their toxins in prepared forages is essential. The purpose of this paper is to review basic principles of identifying contaminated feeds, review how to collect and where to have samples analyzed, and briefly introduce several toxins and poisonous plants that are likely to contaminate feed in the western United States.

Technical Abstract: When alternative forages are available, grazing animals generally avoid eating poisonous plants. However, when toxic plants are included in prepared feed and hay, they are often consumed and they can poison animals. Alternatively, some normally safe forages can under certain conditions, produce and accumulate toxins and poison livestock. As poisoning often results in fatal or costly debilitating disease, identifying toxic plants and their toxins in prepared forages is essential. The purpose of this paper is to review basic principles of identifying contaminated feeds, review how to collect and where to have samples analyzed, and briefly introduce several toxins and poisonous plants that are likely to contaminate feed in the western United States.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page