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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Predictors of weight loss in Mexican American adolescents

Authors
item Johnston, Craig -
item Tyler, Chermaine -
item Foreyt, John -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 22, 2009
Publication Date: April 22, 2009
Citation: Johnston, C.A., Tyler, C., Foreyt, J.P. 2009. Predictors of weight loss in Mexican American adolescents [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 23:342.1.

Technical Abstract: This study examined predictors of weight change in Mexican American adolescents. Eighty overweight Mexican American children were randomized to receive either the intensive intervention or self help program. Physiological (e.g. standardized BMI (zBMI), percent body fat, and tanner stage), psychological (e.g. weight dissatisfaction, and health related quality of life), and behavioral (e.g. change in zBMI at 3 months) variables taken at baseline were examined. A stepwise regression was conducted to determine predictors of weight loss at 6 months and accounted for 57.1% of the variance in explaining weight change (p <.001). Significant predictors of change in zBMI at 6 months included: zBMI at baseline (beta = -.11, p <.05), change in zBMI at 3 months (beta =.70, p <.001), and psychosocial functioning (beta = -.10, p <.05). Change in zBMI at 3 months accounted for 44% of the variance, while psychosocial functioning, and zBMI at baseline accounted for 3.9, 5.4, and 4.1% of the variance, respectively. Overall, the behavioral predictors accounted for the largest amount of the variance in explaining change in zBMI at 6 months. While psychological and physiological variables were significant predictors of weight change, behavioral changes may be the most important predictor. Psychological variables were unrelated to weight change.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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