Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SUSTAINABLE FUELS AND CHEMICALS

Location: Renewable Product Technology Research Unit

Title: Evaluation of yeast strains for production of fuel ethanol from biomass hydrolysates

Author
item Hughes, Stephen

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 11, 2011
Publication Date: March 11, 2011
Citation: Hughes, S.R. 2011. Evaluation of yeast strains for production of fuel ethanol from biomass hydrolysates [abstract}. Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. p. 3.

Technical Abstract: Robust industrial yeast strains are needed for profitable production of fuel ethanol from mixed biomass waste. USDA, ARS, NCAUR, RPT has been evaluating ethanol-producing yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, engineered GMAX Saccharomyces cerevisiae, irradiated Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pichia stipitis for their ability to be used in various cellulosic, starch, and sucrose biofuel operations. These ethanologenic yeast strains are being evaluated for maximum ethanol yield, ethanol yield from hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously, maximum yield under anaerobic conditions, and highest temperature of ethanol production. Several outcomes for utilizing these strains in specific niches for biomass waste fermentation include: 1) variant Pichia stipitis as a universal crabtree negative cellulosic ethanol strain using cellobiose, hexose, and pentose sugars without need for air sparging on wheat straw hydrolysates, 2) engineered crabtree positive GMAX Saccharomyces cerevisae strain for universal biomass sugars from a variety of feedstocks, and 3) a high-temperature anaerobic Kluyveromyces marxianus strain for utilization of pectin waste and biomass sugars. The outcomes of cellulosic ethanol production through fermentation and the value-added products and coproducts produced from these platform strains will be discussed.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page