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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY Title: Improved nutrient intake and diet quality associated with lean beef consumption in the US: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004

Authors
item Zanovec, Michael -
item Oneil, Carol -
item Keast, Debra -
item Fulgoni, Victor -
item Nicklas, Theresa -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2010
Publication Date: April 24, 2010
Citation: Zanovec, M., O'Neil, C., Keast, D., Fulgoni, V., Nicklas, T. 2010. Improved nutrient intake and diet quality associated with lean beef consumption in the US: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004 [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 24:560.6.

Technical Abstract: The dietary guidelines recommend consuming meats in its lowest fat form. NHANES 1999–2004 24-hr dietary recall data were used to compare nutrient intake and diet quality (HEI-2005) between highest lean/lowest fat (HLLF) beef consumers, and lowest lean/highest fat (LLHF) beef consumers aged 4+ y (n equals 11,507). Beef intakes were determined by summing amounts of beef contained in survey foods. The fat content of beef consumed was linked to the survey-specific Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Beef consumers were classified into tertile groups based on the fat content of beef consumed. HLLF beef consumers had higher protein intake; lower energy; total, saturated, and monounsaturated fat; and carbohydrate than LLHF beef consumers. HLLF beef consumers also had significantly higher intakes of vitamins A, C, B3, B6, B12; phosphorus; magnesium; iron; zinc; and potassium; and lower intake of calcium than LLHF beef consumers. Compared to the LLHF beef group, HLLF beef consumers also had higher cup equivalent intakes of total vegetables, dark green/orange vegetables, and legumes, higher meat oz equiv, lower grain oz equiv, lower milk cup equiv, and lower energy from solid fat and SoFAAS. Additionally, HLLF beef consumers had higher total HEI scores than LLHF beef consumers (51.0 +/- 0.3 vs. 45.2 +/- 0.3). Improved nutrient intake and diet quality were associated with consumption of lean beef.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014