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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Improved nutrient intake and diet quality with 100% fruit juice consumption in children: NHANES 2003-2006

Authors
item Oneil, Carol -
item Fulgoni, Victor -
item Zanovec, Michael -
item Nicklas, Theresa -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2010
Publication Date: April 24, 2010
Citation: O'Neil, C., Fulgoni, V., Zanovec, M., Nicklas, T. 2010. Improved nutrient intake and diet quality with 100% fruit juice consumption in children: NHANES 2003-2006 [abstract]. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 24:561.3.

Technical Abstract: Fruit juice (FJ) consumption has recently been viewed as a sweetened beverage with little regard to its nutrient contribution to the diet. NHANES, 2003–2006, data were used to examine the association of 100% FJ consumption, with nutrient intake and diet quality in children ages 2–5 y (n equals 1,665) and 6–12 y (n equals 2,446). Mean usual intakes, standard errors, and regression analyses (juice independent variable; vitamins/minerals and Healthy Eating Index-2005 [HEI] were dependent variables) were determined using sample weights. Mean daily intake of 100 percent FJ was 5.76 +/- 0.17oz (2–5 y) and 2.59 +/- 0.37oz (6–12 y); 29 percent (2–5 y) and 43 percent (6–12 y) did not consume 100 percent FJ on the day of the recall. In children 2–5 y, magnesium (p equals 0.004), potassium (p less than 0.001), vitamin C (p less than 0.0001), and HEI (p less than 0.0001) (specifically whole fruit and whole grain) increased linearly and added sugars decreased linearly (p less than 0.0001) with higher levels of FJ consumption; in children 6–12y, magnesium (p less than 0.0001), calcium (p less than 0.0001), potassium (p less than 0.0001), dietary fiber (p less than 0.0001), vitamin C (p less than 0.0001) and HEI (p less than 0.0001) increased linearly and added sugars decreased linearly (p less than 0.0001) with higher intakes of FJ. On average, 100 percent FJ consumption did not exceed the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendation for children and was associated with increased consumption of key nutrients and better diet quality in children.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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