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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IDENTIFYING THE NEXT GENERATION OF MALTING BARLEY THROUGH IMPROVED SELECTION CRITERIA AND QUALITY ANALYSIS OF BREEDING LINES

Location: Cereal Crops Research

Title: Procedure for malting extremely small quantities of barley

Authors
item Schmitt, Mark
item Budde, Allen

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 11, 2011
Publication Date: June 12, 2011
Citation: Schmitt, M., Budde, A.D. 2011. Procedure for malting extremely small quantities of barley [abstract]. American Society of Brewing Chemists Annual Meeting, June 11-15, 2011, Fort Myers, Florida. Paper No. O8.

Technical Abstract: Micromalting procedures for malt quality analysis typically use 50 – 500 g of barley, and can produce malt with characteristics representative of those produced at a commercial scale. Modifications to routine micromalting protocols in which small quantities of grain within inexpensive mesh containers are surrounded by a larger quantity of grain in standard malting containers allow representative malts to be generated from 2 g of barley. The sample scale enables multiplexing samples within a malting container such that several different samples can be malted in the space formerly needed for a single sample, thereby increasing the potential malting throughput of existing micromalting equipment. The combination of this extremely small-scale malting procedure with previously described reduced-quantity mashing and malt analysis procedures greatly expands the capacity for preliminary screening of malt quality characteristics. This potentially benefits malting barley germplasm development programs by increasing sample throughput and reducing analysis turn-around time. In addition, the ability to generate and analyze representative malts on this very small scale may be useful in research studies where grain samples are limited, such as might occur in specially-developed genetic populations. This ability to malt extremely small amounts of barley will facilitate basic research studies examining the genetic and biochemical bases of malting quality

Last Modified: 12/28/2014