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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH TO DEVELOP STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRESERVING PLANT GENETIC DIVERSITY IN EX SITU GENEBANKS

Location: Plant Germplasm Preservation Research Unit

Title: Duplication in the Domestica Apple Collection within the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System in Geneva, New York

Authors
item Volk, Gayle
item Gross, Briana
item Richards, Christopher
item Szwec-Mcfadden, Amy -
item Forsline, Philip
item Fazio, Gennaro

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2010
Publication Date: November 14, 2010
Citation: Volk, G.M., Gross, B.L., Richards, C.M., Szwec-Mcfadden, A., Forsline, P.L., Fazio, G. 2010. Duplication in the Domestica Apple Collection within the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System in Geneva, New York. Meeting Abstract. 5th International Rosaceae Genomics Conference, November 14-17, 2010. South Africa. pp. P53.

Interpretive Summary: The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System maintains a collection of more than 1300 named accessions of apple cultivars in a field collection in Geneva, NY. It is important to improve efficiencies in collection management. The USDA apple cultivars were “fingerprinted” using nuclear DNA markers. One hundred twenty-seven fingerprints represented 348 of the accessions in the collection, indicating that a number of highly similar (or identical) accessions are maintained. Among the matches, we identified cultivars that matched to rootstocks, sets of sports, accessions with the same name in different languages, and accessions with similar names from different countries. Further observations will confirm the similarity between accessions.

Technical Abstract: The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System maintains more than 1300 named accessions of Malus x domestica in a field collection in Geneva, NY. Seven microsatellite markers (GD12, GD15, GD96, GD103, GD142, GD147, GD162) were used to identify duplicates within a set of 1240 domestica accessions within the USDA collection. Each of the SSR loci contributed enough allelic variation that a multilocus random match probability among duplicates could be calculated with high confidence. One hundred twenty-seven genotypes represented 348 of the accessions within the collection. Among the matches, we identified cultivars that matched to rootstocks, sets of sports, accessions with the same name in different languages, and accessions with similar names from different countries. Visual observations and phenotypic data will confirm the similarity between accessions that was identified using the genotypic markers.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014