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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY Title: Improved diet quality, nutrient intake, and health associated with out-of-hand tree nut consumption in U.S. adults: NHANES 1999–2004

Authors
item Fulgoni, Victor -
item O'Neil, Carol -
item Keast, Debra -
item Nicklas, Theresa -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2010
Publication Date: April 16, 2010
Citation: Fulgoni, V.L., O'Neil, C.E., Keast, D.R., Nicklas, T.A. 2010. Improved diet quality, nutrient intake, and health associated with out-of-hand tree nut consumption in U.S. adults: NHANES 1999–2004 [abstract]. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 24:324.4.

Technical Abstract: HANES (1999–2004), data were used to examine the association of out-of-hand tree nut consumption (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, filberts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts) with diet quality, nutrient intakes, and health risks in adults 19+ yrs (n equals 13,292). Using 24 hour recall data, tree nut consumption was defined as intake of greater than or equal to 1/4 ounce/d tree nuts eaten out-of-hand, excluding tree nuts contained in cereals and other foods. Means, prevalence rates, and standard errors, were determined via ANOVA (adjusted for covariates). Consumers (n equals 514) had improved diet quality, measured using Healthy Eating Index-2005, (60.0 +/- 0.6 vs. 49.6 +/- 0.3, p less than 0.01) and significantly higher (p less than 0.01) intakes of adult shortfall nutrients (difference between groups): fiber (4.5 g/d), vitamin E (3.9 mg AT/d), magnesium (102 mg/d), and potassium (278 mg/d) with lower sodium intake (–283 mg/d). BMI (–0.9 kg/m2, p less than 0.01), waist circumference (–2.0 cm, p less than 0.01) and the prevalence (%) of hypertension (29.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 33.8 +/- 0.7, p less than 0.05), low HDL-C (27.8 +/- 2.2 vs. 34.0 +/- 0.7, p less than 0.01), and metabolic syndrome (17.7 +/- 2.5 vs. 26.3 +/- 0.7, p less than 0.01) were lower in consumers as compared to non-consumers. Tree nut consumption was associated with a higher overall diet quality score, improved nutrient intakes, and lower prevalence of health risks.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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