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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH TO DEVELOP STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRESERVING PLANT GENETIC DIVERSITY IN EX SITU GENEBANKS

Location: Plant Germplasm Preservation Research Unit

Title: Cotton domestication: Dramatic changes in a single cell

Authors
item Gross, Briana
item Strasburg, Jared -

Submitted to: BioMed Central Biology
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: November 5, 2010
Publication Date: November 15, 2010
Citation: Gross, B.L., Strasburg, J.L. 2010. Cotton domestication: Dramatic changes in a single cell. BioMed Central Biology. 8:137-139.

Interpretive Summary: Problem: Although research into the genetic basis of plant domestication is accelerating, at least in terms of the number of genes that have been cloned and characterized, there is still a gap in our knowledge as to the effects of these genetic changes on plant growth and development. Accomplishment: This manuscript represents a summary and perspective on a paper (Rapp et al., 2010) reporting an advancement in understanding the genetic effects of plant domestication, using cotton as a model system. Impact: We summarize the findings in the paper and offer perspective on what it means for plant science as well as pointing out the necessary next steps for future research. Note: This manuscript will be published concurrently with the Rapp et al. (2010) paper, which is currently in press.

Technical Abstract: Understanding the nature of genetic changes underpinning plant domestication is critical for untangling the evolutionary history of crops and for improving modern cultivars. A recent study in cotton provides information about the effects of domestication, showing that dramatic genome-wide changes in gene expression in cotton fiber cells have accompanied selection for increased fiber yield and quality, often in a surprisingly coordinated fashion.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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