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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESPONSE OF DIVERSE RICE GERMPLASM TO BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC STRESSES

Location: Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center

Title: Gene discovery of crop disease in the postgenome era

Author
item Jia, Yulin

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 28, 2010
Publication Date: March 18, 2011
Citation: Jia, Y. 2011. Gene discovery of crop disease in the postgenome era. In: Gu, W., Wang, Y., editors. Gene Discovery for Disease Models, 1st edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. p. 425-441.

Interpretive Summary: Plant resistance (R) genes provide effective protection against invading pathogens at the front line of defense. Advances in genomic technology have accelerated efforts to characterize a wide range of crop R genes from diverse and economically important crops, resulting in effective crop protection. Thus far, over 100 plant R genes have been molecularly cloned. Most cloned plant R genes were predicted to be receptor proteins with nucleotide binding sites and a leucine rich repeat domain (NBS-LRR). In contrast, the effectors that trigger plant R gene-dependent immunity are random molecules and rapidly evolve. Understanding how plant R genes evolve to recognize the effectors is a challenge in plant biology. The map-based cloning technique is the most commonly used method for plant R gene isolation. This technique involves identification of candidate R genes based on integrated genetic and physical maps using a mapping population and verification of resistant function of R genes using genetic transformation. The techniques for map-based cloning, and structure and function of R genes with emphasis on R genes to the rice blast fungus, the most devastating fungal pathogen of rice, are reviewed.

Technical Abstract: Plant resistance (R) genes provide effective protection against invading pathogens at the front line of defense. Advances in genomic technology have accelerated efforts to characterize a wide range of crop R genes from diverse and economically important crops, resulting in effective crop protection. Thus far, over 100 plant R genes have been molecularly cloned. Most cloned plant R genes were predicted to be receptor proteins with nucleotide binding sites and a leucine rich repeat domain (NBS-LRR). In contrast, the effectors that trigger plant R gene-dependent immunity are random molecules and rapidly evolve. Understanding how plant R genes evolve to recognize the effectors is a challenge in plant biology. The map-based cloning technique is the most commonly used method for plant R gene isolation. This technique involves identification of candidate R genes based on integrated genetic and physical maps using a mapping population and verification of resistant function of R genes using genetic transformation. The techniques for map-based cloning, and structure and function of R genes with emphasis on R genes to the rice blast fungus, the most devastating fungal pathogen of rice, are reviewed.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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