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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH TO DEVELOP STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRESERVING PLANT GENETIC DIVERSITY IN EX SITU GENEBANKS Title: Diversity and Domestication of Apples

Authors
item Volk, Gayle
item Richards, Christopher
item Forsline, Philip

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2010
Publication Date: November 14, 2010
Citation: Volk, G.M., Richards, C.M., Forsline, P.L. 2010. Diversity and Domestication of Apples. Meeting Abstract. 5th International Rosaceae Genomics Conference, November 14-17, 2010. South Africa. pp. O51.

Interpretive Summary: Species within Malus are genetically diverse. Individuals within the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System have been identified with ploidies ranging from diploid to hexaploid. Chloroplast sequence data from seven regions have revealed genetic relationships among apple species and has aided in the assignment of individuals to specific species. We have also used both chloroplast sequence data and nuclear microsatellite data to determine genetic relationships among European cider apples and wild apple species including M. sieversii, M. orientalis, and M. sylvestris as well as species of Chinese origin. The integration of genetic data types over large populations of individuals will serve to understand the complex and reticulate history of apple domestication.

Technical Abstract: Species within Malus are genetically diverse. Individuals within the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System have been identified with ploidies ranging from diploid to hexaploid. Chloroplast sequence data from seven regions have revealed genetic relationships among apple species and has aided in the assignment of individuals to specific species. We have also used both chloroplast sequence data and nuclear microsatellite data to determine genetic relationships among European cider apples and wild apple species including M. sieversii, M. orientalis, and M. sylvestris as well as species of Chinese origin. The integration of genetic data types over large populations of individuals will serve to understand the complex and reticulate history of apple domestication.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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