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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF GENETIC RESOURCES FOR VITIS, PRUNUS, JUGLANS, FICUS, OLEA, PISTACIA, PUNICA, DIOSPYROS, ACTINIDIA, AND MORUS

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Rep - Tree Fruit & Nut Crops & Grapes

Title: Efficiencies in alginate encapsulation of vegetative explants

Authors
item George, Laurie -
item Preece, John

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2010
Publication Date: August 17, 2010
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=53-06-20-00
Citation: George, L.J., Preece, J.E. 2010. Efficiencies in Alginate Encapsulation of Vegetative Explants. HortScience. 45(8):S163

Interpretive Summary: The goal of this study was to improve a non-mechanized bulk encapsulation technique to standardize encapsulation procedures and reduce the labor time compared to encapsulating individual nodes. Four mm-long nodal segments from Stage II cultures of Hibiscus moscheutos L. ‘Lord Baltimore’ were encapsulated as groups of 5 segments in matrix masses gelled with 2.5 - 3.25% sodium alginate that were solidified with 60 - 90mM calcium chloride in various experiments. Encapsulated masses were placed in sterile Petri dishes, sealed with parafilm, and placed in darkness at 5 °C for four weeks. They were then removed from refrigeration and placed on fresh Stage II medium and incubated at 25 °C under cool white fluorescent lamps for four weeks when data were taken. There was a significant interaction between the alginate viscosity and the calcium chloride concentration for subsequent shoot length. The most axillary shoots grew when the masses were encapsulated in 3% alginate and 60 mM CaCl2. The longest shoots grew from nodal segments encapsulated with 2.75% alginate that was solidified with 60 mM CaCl2. The most roots grew from masses of nodal segments encapsulated in 2.5% alginate solidified with 60 mM CaCl2.

Technical Abstract: The goal of this study was to improve a non-mechanized bulk encapsulation technique to standardize encapsulation procedures and reduce the labor time compared to encapsulating individual nodes. Four mm-long nodal segments from Stage II cultures of Hibiscus moscheutos L. ‘Lord Baltimore’ were encapsulated as groups of 5 segments in matrix masses gelled with 2.5 - 3.25% sodium alginate that were solidified with 60 - 90mM calcium chloride in various experiments. Encapsulated masses were placed in sterile Petri dishes, sealed with parafilm, and placed in darkness at 5 °C for four weeks. They were then removed from refrigeration and placed on fresh Stage II medium and incubated at 25 °C under cool white fluorescent lamps for four weeks when data were taken. There was a significant interaction between the alginate viscosity and the calcium chloride concentration for subsequent shoot length. The most axillary shoots grew when the masses were encapsulated in 3% alginate and 60 mM CaCl2. The longest shoots grew from nodal segments encapsulated with 2.75% alginate that was solidified with 60 mM CaCl2. The most roots grew from masses of nodal segments encapsulated in 2.5% alginate solidified with 60 mM CaCl2.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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