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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH, ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DOCUMENTATION OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES Title: Phylogeny, phylogeography and genetic diversity of Pisum genus

Authors
item Smykal, Petr -
item Kenicer, Gregory -
item Flavell, Andrew -
item Kosterin, Oleg -
item Redden, Robert -
item Ford, Rebecca -
item Coyne, Clarice
item Maxted, Nigel -
item Ambrose, Mike -
item Ellis, T.H. -

Submitted to: Plant Genetic Resources
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 28, 2010
Publication Date: November 17, 2010
Citation: Smykal, P., Kenicer, G., Flavell, A.J., Kosterin, O., Redden, R.J., Ford, R., Coyne, C.J., Maxted, N., Ambrose, M.J., Ellis, T.N. 2010. Phylogeny, phylogeography and genetic diversity of Pisum genus. Plant Genetic Resources. 1-15 doi:10.1017/S147926211000033X.

Interpretive Summary: Study of phylogeography using combination of plastid and nuclear markers suggested the spread of wild pea from centre of origin (Middle East), eastwards and westwards to Mediterranean region. Analysis of genetic diversity identified separate clusters containing wild material, distinguishing P. fulvum from P. elatius and P. abyssinicum , supporting the view of separate species or subspecies. Moreover, accessions of domesticated peas of Afghanistan, Ethiopian and Chinese origin were distinguished. In addition to showing the genetic relationships, these results also provided insight into geographical and phylogenetical partitioning of genetic diversity. This study provides the framework for defining a world Pisum germplasm diversity well as suggested model for the domestication of the cultivated species. These findings show that although introgression was common in pea domestication, many of diversity reside in wild material and could be used further in breeding. Although existing collections contains over 10,000 pea accessions, effort should be put to collect more of wild material to preserve genetic diversity of species.

Technical Abstract: Tribe Fabeae (formerly Vicieae) contains some of humanity's most important grain legume crops, namely Lathyrus; Lens; Pisum; Vicia and the monotypic genus Vavilovia. Our study based on molecular data, have positioned Pisum between Vicia and Lathyrus and being closely allied to Vavilovia. Study of phylogeography using combination of plastid and nuclear markers suggested the spread of wild pea from centre of origin (Middle East), eastwards and westwards to Mediterranean region. To allow direct data comparison, the Pisum genus germplasm collections, we performed model-based Bayesian analysis of the population structure of retrotransposon-based markers using BAPS software on the composed set of 4,429 accessions from three large world germplasm collections including both wild and domesticated pea. Analysis of genetic diversity identified separate clusters containing wild material, distinguishing P. fulvum from P. elatius and P. abyssinicum , supporting the view of separate species or subspecies. Moreover, accessions of domesticated peas of Afghanistan, Ethiopian and Chinese origin were distinguished. In addition to showing the genetic relationships, these results also provided insight into geographical and phylogenetical partitioning of genetic diversity. This study provides the framework for defining a world Pisum germplasm diversity well as suggested model for the domestication of the cultivated species. These findings show that although introgression was common in pea domestication, many of diversity reside in wild material and could be used further in breeding. Although existing collections contains over 10,000 pea accessions, effort should be put to collect more of wild material to preserve genetic diversity of species.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014