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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FROM BARLEY TO BIOMASS - THE DEVELOPMENT OF A REGIONAL MULTI-FEEDSTOCK BIOREFINERY

Location: Sustainable Biofuels and Co-Products

Title: Ethanol production from starch-rich crops other than corn and the composition and value of the resulting DDGS

Authors
item Moreau, Robert
item Nghiem, Nhuan
item Rosentrater, Kurt
item Johnston, David
item Hicks, Kevin

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2010
Publication Date: August 1, 2011
Citation: Moreau, R.A., Nghiem, N.P., Rosentrater, K.A., Johnston, D., Hicks, K.B. 2012. Ethanol production from starch-rich crops other than corn and the composition and value of the resulting DDGS. In: Liu, K., Rosentrater, K.A., editors. Distillers Grains: Production, Properties and Utilization. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. p. 103-117.

Technical Abstract: Because corn (maize, Zea mays) is the predominant feedstock for fuel ethanol in the US and in many other countries, most of the chapters in this book focus on ethanol production and DDGS composition from corn. However, corn is not the only starch-rich crop that has been used as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. This chapter will describe eleven other starch-rich crops which have been used as feedstock for fuel ethanol (sorghum, barley, wheat, triticale, rye, oats, rice, pearl millet, field peas, cassava, and sweet potato). The use of winter barley as cover crops and then using the grain as ethanol feedstock on the East Coast is creating a new paradigm: the ability to produce a low-greenhouse gas advanced biofuel from a feedstock that we now know how to convert. This model can be repeated in many different parts of the US and abroad. Each location may have a different crop but it can have the same effect.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014