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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING PRODUCTION STRATEGIES IN CHANNEL CATFISH FARMING

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: Toxicity of Selected Mosquito Sprays to Channel Catfish Sac Fry

Author
item Mischke, C -

Submitted to: Journal of the World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 19, 2008
Publication Date: February 1, 2009
Citation: Mischke, C.C. 2009. Toxicity of Selected Mosquito Sprays to Channel Catfish Sac Fry. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society. 41:168-170.

Interpretive Summary: In the spring when channel catfish hatcheries are in full operation, the associated moisture and warm temperatures provide a haven for mosquitoes. Large swarms of biting mosquitoes in a hatchery can make the tedious work of egg-picking (i.e., removing dead and fungus-infested eggs from egg masses) and feeding fry almost unbearable. Besides causing undesirable working conditions—for workers sensitive to mosquito bites, blisters, bruises, or large inflammatory reactions can occur—mosquitoes also harbor viruses or other diseases that can be transmitted to humans, including West Nile Virus. In many hatcheries, a few strategically placed fans for air movement can remediate the mosquito problem. However, during certain years and in some hatcheries, additional control is needed. Several chemical repellents are available for mosquito control, but their toxicity to catfish fry is not known. The objective of this study was to screen chemical mosquito repellents and a common synergist for their toxicity to channel catfish sac fry.

Technical Abstract: In the spring when channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, hatcheries are in full operation, the associated moisture and warm temperatures provide a haven for mosquitoes. Large swarms of biting mosquitoes in a hatchery can make the tedious work of egg-picking (i.e., removing dead and fungus-infested eggs from egg masses) and feeding fry almost unbearable. Besides causing undesirable working conditions—for workers sensitive to mosquito bites, blisters, bruises, or large inflammatory reactions can occur—mosquitoes also harbor viruses or other diseases that can be transmitted to humans, including West Nile Virus. In many hatcheries, a few strategically placed fans for air movement can remediate the mosquito problem. However, during certain years and in some hatcheries, additional control is needed. Several chemical repellents are available for mosquito control, but their toxicity to catfish fry is not known. The objective of this study was to screen chemical mosquito repellents and a common synergist for their toxicity to hannel catfish sac fry.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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