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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Enhancement of Hard Spring Wheat, Durum, and Oat Quality

Location: Cereal Crops Research

Title: Refrigerated Dough Quality: Effect of Environment and Genotypes of Hard Red Spring Wheat

Authors
item Simsek, Senay -
item Whitney, K -
item Ohm, Jae-Bom
item Anderson, James -
item Mergoum, M -

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 10, 2010
Publication Date: January 15, 2011
Citation: Simsek, S., Whitney, K.L., Ohm, J., Anderson, J., Mergoum, M. 2011. Refrigerated Dough Quality: Effect of Environment and Genotypes of Hard Red Spring Wheat. Journal of Food Science. 76:S101-S107.

Interpretive Summary: Products obtained from refrigerated doughs account for greater than $1.7 billion per year in sales in the US, and they are one of the fastest growing segments of the ready-to-use, grain-based food industry. Wheat flour is a primary ingredient of refrigerated dough products and, therefore, its quality and chemical composition affects the quality of the final products. Flour samples which were milled from six hard red spring wheat varieties grown in three locations in Minnesota, USA, were evaluated for use in refrigerated dough products. An important factor in the suitability of flour for refrigerated dough products is syruping during storage. Water separates from the dough and forms syrup that leaks out of the package during refrigerated storage. This phenomenon, called “dough syruping”, is unacceptable to consumers. The extent of dough syruping was measured over a ten day refrigeration period in the present study. Refrigerated dough syruping showed a large variability among wheat varieties and growing locations. The average dough syruping on day ten ranged from 2.05 to 14.83 percent. Dough samples made from two wheat varieties, Glenn and Oklee, were identified to have consistently lower dough syrup formation, showing greater stability across growing locations and storage days when compared with other varieties.

Technical Abstract: Refrigerated dough products use wheat flour as their primary ingredient, so the quality and chemical composition of the flour determine the quality of the final product. Six varieties of hard red spring wheat, grown in three locations in Minnesota, USA were evaluated for use in refrigerated dough products. Total arabinoxylan percentages in the flours ranged from 0.97 to 1.54. Xylanase activity of the flour was measured and ranged from 0.20-0.84 mU/g. An important factor in the suitability for refrigerated dough is the syruping during storage. The extent of dough syruping was measured over a period of ten days. There was a large amount of variability in dough syruping among the varieties and locations. The average dough syruping on day ten ranged from 2.05 to 14.83 percent. Despite the significant interaction effect of genotype and environment, two varieties, Glenn and Oklee, had lower dough syrup formation with greater stability across growing locations and storage days than other varieties.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014