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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Feasibility study of an obesity "Prevention Plus" intervention targeting children and parenting practices: Helping HAND

Authors
item O'Connor, Teresia -
item Hilmers, Angela -
item Watson, Kathy -
item Baranowski, Tom -

Submitted to: International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2010
Publication Date: June 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://www.isbnpa.org/media/pdfs/2010%20ISBNPA%20Abstract%20Book%20PDF.pdf
Citation: O'Connor, T., Hilmers, A., Watson, K., Baranowski, T. 2010. Feasibility study of an obesity "Prevention Plus" intervention targeting children and parenting practices: Helping HAND [abstract]. In: International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abstract Book, June 9-12, 2010, Minneapolis, MN. p. 274-275.

Technical Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test for feasibility and obesity intervention, targeting 5-8 year old children with BMI 85-99%tile in community primary care clinics. Randomized controlled trial with child and parenting data obtained pre and post intervention. Based on social cognitive and parenting theories, the intervention was delivered monthly for 6 months and families self-selected from 7 child behaviors and corresponding parenting practices. Mixed model analyses of variance tested group differences over time while controlling for baseline parent and child BMI, child age, and parenting practices. Sample (n=40) characteristics: 80% girls, mean age 6.8 years (sd 1.0), mean BMI z-score 1.84 (0.35); 82.5% Hispanic, 12.5% black, 5% white; and 65% had income <$30,000/year. 85% attended >= 4/6 session. Attrition was 15%. 'Be more Active' was the most commonly targeted behavior. There was no significant group x time interaction of BMI z-score, as expected in a pilot study. Controlling for covariates, the change in TV viewing was clinically relevant F (1, 29) =2.7, p=.11, with change in intervention group -4.6 (3.0) vs. control group +2.4 (3.1) hrs/wk. However, only 50% targeted TV viewing as a behavior. Intervention subjects mean change in TV viewing for those targeting TV was -8.1 (5.1) vs. not targeting +0.7 (6.6) hrs/wk. Families targeting TV had trends showing increased parenting TV restriction and less co-viewing compared to controls and those not targeting TV. It was concluded that this Prevention-Plus intervention was feasible given low attrition and showed promise for decreasing TV viewing and improving associated parenting practices.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014