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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVE NUTRITION FOR HONEY BEE COLONIES TO STIMULATE POPULATION GROWTH, INCREASE QUEEN QUALITY, AND REDUCE THE IMPACT OF VARROA MITES

Location: Honey Bee Research

Title: Carbohydrate composition of high fructose corn syrups (HFCS) used for bee feeding. Effect on honey composition.

Authors
item Ruiz-Matute, A -
item Weiss, Milagra -
item Sammataro, Diana
item Finley-Short, Jennifer
item Sanz, M -

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2010
Publication Date: May 21, 2010
Citation: Ruiz-Matute, A.I., Weiss, M., Sammataro, D., Finley, J.V., Sanz, M.L. 2010. Carbohydrate composition of high fructose corn syrups (HFCS) used for bee feeding. Effect on honey composition.. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 58:7317-7322.

Interpretive Summary: The composition of high fructose corn syrups (HFCS) from commercial manufacturers as well as from beekeepers was characterized by GC-MS. Sucrose syrups (SS) were also included in this work for comparison. We found complex carbohydrates, including Fructosyl-fructoses and fructosyl-glucoses were detected. The toxic degredation by product, Hyudroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content of the samples supplied by beekeepers was 64.61 ppm (plus or minus 16.92 ppm) above the 40 ppm that is toxic. The honey made from HFCS and SS was also analyzed and Fructosyl-fructose were detected mostly in honeys from HFCS, which was notably different from those honeys coming from free-flying bees or bees fed with SS.

Technical Abstract: In the present study, carbohydrate composition of high fructose corn syrups (HFCS) from commercial manufacturers as well as from beekeepers was deeply characterised by GC-MS. Sucrose syryps (SS) were also included in this work for comparison. Fructosyl-fructoses and some unknown carbohydrates probably fructosyl-glucoses have been detected in HFCS by first time, while SS were mainly characterised by the high contents of sucrose. Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content of samples supplied by beekeepers was much more variable; the mean level of HMF was 64.61 ppm (plus or minus 16.92 ppm, 95% C.I. ranging from 26.91 to 102.31 ppm). Syrups were used to feed caged bees and the produced honeys were analyzed in order to determine their influence in carbohydrate composition. Fructosl-fructoses were detected in honeys from bees fed with HFCS, this composition being notably different from those honeys coming from free-flying bees or bees fed with SS.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014