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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED INSECT AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: Bionomics and Integrated Control of the Sunflower Seed Maggot, (Neotephritis finalis) and the Sunflower Bud Moth (Suleima helianthana) in the Northern Plains Sunflower Production Region: 2009 Results

Authors
item Knodel, Janet -
item Ganehiarachchi, Mangala -
item Beauzay, Patrick -
item Charlet, Laurence

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 12, 2010
Publication Date: February 14, 2010
Repository URL: http://sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Knodel_Bionomics_10.pdf
Citation: Knodel, J.J., Ganehiarachchi, M., Beauzay, P.B., Charlet, L.D. 2010. Bionomics and Integrated Control of the Sunflower Seed Maggot, (Neotephritis finalis) and the Sunflower Bud Moth (Suleima helianthana) in the Northern Plains Sunflower Production Region: 2009 Results. 32nd Sunflower Research Workshop, January 13-14, 2010, Fargo, ND. Available: http://sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Knodel_Bionomics_10.pdf

Interpretive Summary: The biology of sunflower seed maggot is described in detail. Studies during 2009 indicated that delayed planting date can be an effective way to mitigate head damage from sunflower seed maggot and sunflower bud moth. It was difficult to assess results from the insecticide efficacy and insecticide mode of action studies due to low population densities of adult sunflower seed maggots and sunflower bud moths or a missed application timing of insecticides. Results from the 2009 National Sunflower Association Sunflower Survey showed that damage from the sunflower seed maggot and sunflower bud moth have decreased from previous years, in spite of some localized 'hot spots' of moderate-severe infestations. Since little is known of the biology of these insects, the recent observations of low population densities may be due to unknown larval mortality, pupal parasitoids, low fecundity and/or environmental conditions. Additional research is needed to determine viable pest management strategies for control of sunflower seed maggot and sunflower bud moth if they become problems in the future.

Technical Abstract: Studies during 2009 revealed that delayed planting date was effective in reducing head damage in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) from the sunflower seed maggot, Neotephritis finalis (Loew) and sunflower bud moth, Suleima helianthana (Riley). Results from the insecticide efficacy and insecticide mode of action studies were difficult to assess because of low population densities of adult sunflower seed maggots and sunflower bud moths or insecticide application timing. Results from the 2009 National Sunflower Association Sunflower Survey showed that damage from the sunflower seed maggot and sunflower bud moth have decreased from previous years, in spite of some localized fields with moderate-severe infestations. Because of limited knowledge of the biology of these insect pests, the recent observations of low population densities may be due to unknown larval mortality, pupal parasitoids, low fecundity and/or environmental conditions. Additional research is needed to determine viable pest management strategies for control of sunflower seed maggot and sunflower bud moth if they become problems in the future.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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