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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NATIONAL ANIMAL GERMPLASM PROGRAM (NAGP) Title: The facilitating roles and uses of gene banks in addressing the global plan of action

Author
item Blackburn, Harvey

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2010
Publication Date: July 31, 2010
Citation: Blackburn, H.D. 2010. The facilitating roles and uses of gene banks in addressing the global plan of action. World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production August 1-6, 2010 Leipzig, Germany. Meeting Proceedings.

Interpretive Summary: Contractions of livestock genetic resources are occurring as countries strive to meet increasing demand for livestock products. The Global Plan of Action’s (GPA) Strategic Priority Area 3 – Conservation, calls for governments to establish gene banks for ex-situ cryogenic conservation. Establishment and operation of national gene banks is an effective mechanism to conserve livestock genetics. In addition to this responsibility gene banks can be used by industry and the research community for additional purposes. Gene banks can provide germplasm for the development and/or reconstitution of experimental populations, a source of DNA for gene discovery, and exploration of physiological changes that have occurred over time within or among breeds. Increasing the scope of gene bank operations to accommodate such activities provides a cost effective approach for utilizing genetic resources.

Technical Abstract: Contractions of livestock genetic resources are occurring as countries strive to meet increasing demand for livestock products. The Global Plan of Action’s (GPA) Strategic Priority Area 3 – Conservation, calls for governments to establish gene banks for ex-situ cryogenic conservation. Establishment and operation of national gene banks is an effective mechanism to conserve livestock genetics. In addition to this responsibility gene banks can be used by industry and the research community for additional purposes. Gene banks can provide germplasm for the development and/or reconstitution of experimental populations, a source of DNA for gene discovery, and exploration of physiological changes that have occurred over time within or among breeds. Increasing the scope of gene bank operations to accommodate such activities provides a cost effective approach for utilizing genetic resources.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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