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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USDA NATIONAL NUTRIENT DATABANK FOR FOOD COMPOSITION

Location: Nutrient Data

Title: USDA Database for the Oxygen Radical Capacity (Orac) of Selected Foods, Release 2

Authors
item Haytowitz, David
item Bhagwat, Seema

Submitted to: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: April 12, 2010
Publication Date: May 10, 2010
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata
Citation: Haytowitz, D.B., Bhagwat, S.A. 2010. USDA database for the oxygen radical capacity (ORAC) of selected foods, release 2. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Available: http://www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata

Interpretive Summary: The Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of foods is considered a measure of total antioxidant activity in a specific food product that results from the presence of a number of chemical compounds in foods that act as antioxidants. Oxidative stress is considered to be a contributing factor in the aging process and in the development of various chronic and degenerative diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, and nerve cell degeneration such as what occurs in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Dietary antioxidants may have a role in reducing oxidative stress and thus reduce the risk of these diseases. ORAC data representing 40 sources in the scientific literature and other documents were retrieved, reviewed, and critically evaluated for data quality. Also included are data generated at the University of Arkansas as part of a study conducted under USDA’s National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program (NFNAP) to analyze various bioactive components (flavonoids and proanthocyanidins) in 59 fruits, nuts, and vegetables. Data are presented for hydrophilic ORAC, lipophilic ORAC, total ORAC and total phenolics (TP). The mean, standard error, and minimum and maximum values per 100g edible portions are provided. Confidence codes (data quality) and sources (references) are also provided. Thhis second release of the database is available on NDL’s web site: http://www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata and contains values for 326 foods, providing an additional 49 food items,including values for maple syrup and acai and goji berries. Values for selected cereals, fruits, nuts, vegetables, chocolates, and beverages are included in the database. This updated ORAC database provides reliable values for epidemiological studies to assess the relationship between antioxidant intakes and health status, and to consumers who want to know more about the foods they eat.

Technical Abstract: The Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of foods is thought to be useful in evaluating dietary intake because reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been hypothesized to be related to the aging process and other reports suggest that dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on certain chronic diseases. These include cancer, heart disease, and nerve cell degeneration such as is seen in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Forty peer-reviewed articles and other documents, including data generated at the University of Arkansas as part of a study conducted under USDA’s National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program (NFNAP) to analyze various bioactive components (flavonoids and proanthocyanidins) in 59 fruits, nuts, and vegetables, were critically evaluated to assess data quality. Acceptable analytical data for each food and ORAC component were combined. The database contains values for hydrophilic-ORAC (H-ORAC), lipophilic-ORAC (L-ORAC), Total-ORAC, and total phenolics (TP). The mean, standard error, and minimum and maximum values per 100g edible portions with confidence codes (data quality) and sources (references) are provided. The database is available on NDL’s web site: http://www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata and contains values for 326 foods. This updated ORAC database provides a more complete list of foods and of antioxidant activity in foods and will complement the previously released USDA special interest databases on individual flavonoids (2007), pronthocyanidins (2004), and isoflavones (1999), as well as data on other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid, individual carotenoids, and alpha-tocopherol) which are part of the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. These databases provide reliable values for epidemiological studies to assess the relationship between the dietary intake of bioactive compounds and health status.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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