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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Physiology and Genetic Improvement of Small Fruit Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Distribution of Volatile Composition in 'Marion' (Rubus Species Hyb) Blackberry Pedigree

Authors
item Du, Xiaofen -
item Finn, Chad
item Qian, Michael -

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 19, 2009
Publication Date: January 7, 2010
Citation: Du, X., Finn, C.E., Qian, M. 2010. Distribution of volatile composition in 'Marion' (Rubus Species Hyb) blackberry pedigree. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 1860-1869.

Interpretive Summary: Fruit of 'Marion', as well as those of 'Marion's parents, grandparents, great grandparents and great-great grandparents that were available were evaluated for the volatiles that impact flavor. These various parents include blackberries from several species, raspberry and raspberry-blackberry hybrid genotypes. Each genotype in the pedigree had a specific volatile composition. While we could not determine inheritance of the different volatiles, we could determine trends. For example: Red raspberry was dominated by norisoprenoids, lactones, and acids. 'Logan' and 'Olallie' also had a norisoprenoid dominance but at much lower concentrations. The concentration of norisoprenoids in other blackberry genotypes was significantly lower. Terpenes and furanones were predominant in wild 'Himalaya' blackberry, whereas terpenes were the major volatiles in 'Santiam'. 'Marion', a selection from 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie', contained almost all of the volatile compounds in its pedigree at moderate amount. An inherent pattern was observed for some volatile compounds in the 'Marion' pedigree. Raspberry and 'Logan' had a very high concentration of ß-ionone, but was reduced by half in 'Olallie' and by another half in 'Marion' as the crossing proceeded. A high content of linalool in 'Olallie' and a low content in 'Chehalem' resulted in a moderate content of linalool in their progeny 'Marion'. However, the concentration of furaneol in 'Marion' was higher than in its parents. This information will help us design crosses and experiments to continue our quest to improve blackberry flavor.

Technical Abstract: Fruit of 'Marion', as well as those of 'Marion's parents, grandparents, great grandparents and great-great grandparents that were available were evaluated for the volatiles that impact flavor. These various parents include blackberries from several species, raspberry and raspberry-blackberry hybrid genotypes. Each genotype in the pedigree had a specific volatile composition. While we could not determine inheritance of the different volatiles, we could determine trends. For example, Red raspberry was dominated by norisoprenoids, lactones, and acids. 'Logan' and 'Olallie' also had a norisoprenoid dominance but at much lower concentrations. The concentration of norisoprenoids in other blackberry genotypes was significantly lower. Terpenes and furanones were predominant in wild 'Himalaya' blackberry, whereas terpenes were the major volatiles in 'Santiam'. 'Marion', a selection from 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie', contained almost all of the volatile compounds in its pedigree at moderate amounts. An inherent pattern was observed for some volatile compounds in the 'Marion' pedigree. Raspberry and 'Logan' had a very high concentration of ß-ionone, but was reduced by half in 'Olallie' and by another half in 'Marion' as the crossing proceeded. A high content of linalool in 'Olallie' and a low content in 'Chehalem' resulted in a moderate content of linalool in their progeny 'Marion'. However, the concentration of furaneol in 'Marion' was higher than in its parents. This information will help us design crosses and experiments to continue our quest to improve blackberry flavor.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014